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Full text of "The Procopian (The Eagle)"








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Table of Contents 



Campus Life 


^6 


Organizations 


62 


Sports 


78 


Educators 


102 


Seniors 


118 







As always, Jocile Walsh (above) extends a friendly greeting, also 
welcoming you to the IPSS-Sd IBC Eagle. Theresa Block and John 
Monocco (above right) share a warm snuggle at the World of Polo 
Fund Raiser. Soviet Spy Vince Becl<er (opp. page, above right) mod- 
els the door prize given away at the IBC Scholar's World of Polo in 
Oal< Brook. Taking a break from studying for their Care Bears mid- 
term ore Tricia Airan, Julie Notaro, Ignozio Perez, Cindy Hammerstein 
and Scott Blasz (opp. page far above right). John Norton and Beth 
Kopulos (far right) cuddle close during our Homecoming Dance at 
the Oak Brook Marriot. Lisa Yeh exchanges flowers with Mayur Patel 
(right) reliving an important tradition of any dance. 




Eagles — 
Trendsetters! 




In, out, 
Around and about 



Mike Plese and Keith Andrews (below) enjoy many tiours of hocl<ey, 
even witii an injured piayer down on the ice. Before their Energy and 
the Environment ciass, Frank Wedig and Francine Gadzaia (right) 
discuss a recent Wingspread Schoiar's Conference, Jaeger Hoii Di- 
rector Jeff Clark (below) relaxes after a rough day at the office by — 
what else — jumping rope on a sunny IBC afternoon. 




i 




Bill Moron (above) uses o cleor, cool evening to practice sax behind 
the Ad Building, An impending Inorganic Chemistry test find Maureen 
Stuever, Moyur Patel and Dino Rumoro (left) having a small study 
group. Runs like this from Tom White (far left) made the Eagles 35-7 
victory over North Park possible. 




Having a glorious night at IBC's "Glory Days" are Greg Czerwinski, Pat 
Dorigan, Alicia Kissane. Cindy Gorski, Bob Gerritsen and Pat Parrot 
(above)^ A picture soys o thousand words, especially on that special 
night tor Alex Vrbanoff and Lisa Airan (right). 




Homecoming 1985 
A victory celebration 





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IBC beat North Park 35-7 with a potent offense that mode the big 
ploy when it was needed (left). Queen Nora Crosson and King Don 
Scial<itano (beiow left) pose for us after receiving their crowns. The 
alumni sky box (far below) was a new edition to the stadium at the 
homecoming game, IBC Eaglettes (below) entertain the crowd with 
their special homecoming routine. 




Cheering 
The home team on 





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The IBC Eagles (left) charge onto the field on their way to a Home- 
coming Victory, led by captain Steve Camburn. Charter members of 
IBC's proud crowd are buddies Alicia Kissane, Lynette Kubek, Jeanne 
Manning and Julie Notaro (far left). Homecoming court members Jim 
Glimco, Joe Santucci, Paul LaScalo and Steve Camburn (for above 
left) congratulate Don Sciakitano as he is announced 1985 Home- 
coming King, Suzy Hughes and the other cheerleaders (above left) 
spend the afternoon giving the fans more to cheer about than just a 
winning team, Mike Cadman holds for Martin Daley (above) as he 
kicks off after one of the Eagles' several touchdowns. 



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After a long day of classes and soccer, Jeremy Dobrowolski 
(above) relaxes. Next in Vogue! Diane Mikulecky and Jeanne 
Manning (far above) ore starting a new fashion croze. Even Saga 
Vi/as active in Homecoming as Maria Stonglevi/icz (opp. page 
top right) serves spectators at the football game. Bob Clark (opp. 
page top far right) welcomes visitors to Neuzil Hall. Don Weber 
and Javier Pujols (far right) before their first issue of Gentleman's 
Quarterly taught them the proper way to dress. Capturing those 
memories are Mike Knepler and Vikki Vlastnik (right) before the 
"Glory Days". 



On the 
Lighter side . . . 



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All in ^ 
A day's work 




Neuzil R.A.'s Dino Rumoro and Laura Mraz (right) enjoy some friendly 
conversation as a cliange of pace to always discussing dorm policy. 
Getting down to business in College Physics Laboratory are Roger 
Del Toral and Gerry Dix (below) as they level their apparatus for the 
day's experiment. Intensely worried about next exam, Nancy Bos 
(far below) checks her pocket calendar in front of the library. 




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Mary Ellen Hogan (far left) serves Saga's finest, Dr, Ralph Meeker (left) 
is amused by a memorandum that he is about to read to his Senior 
Scholar's Class. Edwin Sena, Carmella Bartucci, Connie Nickels and Jill 
Vest (above) enjoy a lunch break during freshman orientation. 



13 








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Resting peacefully is ttie unsuspecting Jim Furio (above). Jeanne 
Hnilicka and Mark Miklosz (opp. page top right) enjoy each other's 
company in this homecoming photo. Taking a break from partying is 
Lisa Airan (far right). Freshmen listen intently to Dr. E. Michael Winker's 
General Chemistry iecture (right). 




. 



14 



Something 
For everyone 




CAMPUS LIFE 




Protecting the residents of Neuzil from off 
campus visitors is Igbal Khon (above). 



Posing during a Neuzil Party are Nina Smith, Catliy Hammes, 
Anne Leurck, Mary Olson, Jim Furio, Bob Mertz, Vince Notor- 
ian and Alex Vrbanoff (above). 

Enjoying ttie crisp foli day, Ed Badja (left) plays a friendly 
game in front of Jaeger Hall. 



Jaeger — 

With Age 

Comes 

Wisdom? 



Home to IBC's male underclass- 
men is Jaeger Hall, the oldest 
dormitory on campus. This past year, 
these young men who are notorious for 
their practical jokes and chaotic be- 
havior seem to have settled dov^n 
quite o bit. Could it be the presence of 
their nev^ hall director? Jeff Clark took 
over the reins of Jaeger this year. He 
also added a mascot, his dog. This was 
the last year of single rooms or upper- 
classmen in Jaeger. The basement of 
Jaeger has now been converted into 
an exercise physiology lab for the new 
master's program. Even with the 
changes, Jaeger Hall provides students 
with a fun-filled atmosphere. 




No one gets by Marty Byrne (above) while he is 
on duty at Jaeger. 




18 





Rich Anderson (far above) scolds Anita Peters for not paying 
attention to his explanation of a physics problem. 

With an upcoming dymanics test. Mike Winkler (above) takes 
some time out from being an R,A, to study, 

Tal<ing up residence in Jaeger's Basement while their room is be- 
ing redecorated are Mike Letourneau and Mike Knepier (above 
left). 

The new ''Jaeger Clean Up Crevi/" poses for a group picture 
(left). 



JAEGER HALL 
FIRST FLOOR 





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FRONT ROW: Steve Davidson, Bob Montalbano, Ed Zubay. 
ROW 2: Kevin Beaudin, Gerry Molnar, Ton Abrams, Dan Kemp 
ROW 3: Glen Zimlich, Doug Smith, Joe Garret, Ed McMohon, 



JAEGER STAFF 




FRONT ROW- Joe Santucci, Marty Byrnes. ROW 2 Steve Cam- 
burn, Mike Winkler, Dan Kemp, Ho Sung Pak, Jeff Clark. 



PARADISE HALL 




FRONT ROW: Johnny Koo, Dove Terrel, Doug Beran, Larry Pie- 
trygo, Joe Stocchero, Ho Sung Pak, ROW 2: Mark Klimek, Ed 
Johnson. ROW 3: Jim Widlowski, Mike DeGregorio, Vince 
Becker, Kevin Kavanaugh. 



19 



Paradise 

Lost: But 

Never 

Forgotten 



Tucked away in the southwestern 
corner of Benedictine Hail is the 
Annex, better l<nown to the students as 
Paradise Hall. Home to twelve young 
men, "Paradise" nurtures them with a 
sense of comradeship and unity. Para- 
dise had a long history of being a spe- 
cial place to residents. Tight quarters 
didn't bother the students who exper- 
ienced Paradise. Lasting friends were 
made and many memories were accu- 
mulated. Due to a shortage of space 
on campus. Paradise will be made Into 
offices next year. Although Paradise 
won't be back, the students who had a 
chance to experience living in "broom- 
closet" size rooms will cherish It forever. 

Displaying unusual attire for the men of Jaeger is 
Dave Sudzus (right). 




20 



White enjoying the rays outside of Jaeger, Brian Brieske (left) 
keeps up withi his work, 

Karen Ridge (below) performs one of her on campus services in 
Jaeger as she attempts to braid Steve Davidson's hair, 

John and Patti (far below) demonstrate one of the many intramu- 
ral sports that take place in Jaeger — lounging 




JAEGER HALL 



SECOND FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Pat Lynch, Barry Gates, ROW 2: Bobby Merritt, 
Chris Lobello, Jenny Rissky, Kevin Czerak. Jeff Steinbeck, Joe 
Sontucci, John Siperly, ROW 3: Pot Decraene, Mike Winkler, 
Eric Mayo. Bill Bilings, Aristotle Kornaros, ROW 4: Chris Birck, Brian 
Rewerts, Mark Wanic, John Czech, Don Kotecki, Pat Murray, 
Hugh Gorman 



THIRD FLOOR 




FRONT ROW; Larry Verfurth, Carl Zuber, Steve Sassetti, Mike 
Letourneau, Mike Knepler, Tom Toya, Chris Chua, ROW 2 Brian 
Ruby, Rob Hartwig, Paul Malatestinic, Paul Beierwaltes, Marty 
Byrne, ROW 3: Sergio Ramirez, Ramon Cepeda, Andy Olsen. 
Joe Meunier, Dave Lifko, Steve Gamburn, Tim Grisvi/old, Brett 
Koehler, Kurt Antonacci, Bob Dudek, John Carmody, Brian Ba- 
ker-Watson, Rich Anderson, 



21 



While Julie Notaro poses for the camera on third floor Kohlbeck. Greg Kirwan 
(right) sneal<s up to the door for o peek. 

A picturesque view of Kohlbeck Hall seated right in downtown IBC on a sunny day 
(below). When the weather goes bad, Kohlbeck becomes the main street. 



A Place 

Fit For 

Man nor 

Beast? 

Kohlbeck: A place where the 
roaches outnumber the whole 
student body of IBC. It is somewhere 
that the visitation hours are nonexistent 
and the girls are always on top, even in 
the lofts. This dorm is definitely a study- 
ing dorm, for the hours of 3:00 p.m. -3:01 
p.m. One can always find the R.A., just 
find the keg. But seriously, Kohlbeck 
was a home for the students not like 
any other home was. You could just 
kick back and not worry that your room 
was a mess, nor that you had no more 
clothes to wear. This casual atmo- 
sphere made Kohlbeck unique. Each 
room had its own personality and al- 
most all of them had lofts. Life was sim- 
ple and easy here, all that mattered 
was if there was enough good beer for 
the Softball game and for the party 
afterwards. 

Wtiat do you do when you're locked out of your 
room without an R.A. around'' These Kohlbeck 
residents have the answer (right). 




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22 





KOHLBECK HALL 



FIRST FLOOR 







FRONT ROW: Earnest Sutton, Jotin Horton, ROW 2; Mike Euten- 
euer, Andy Barber, Richi Jagodzinski, Andy Hoftman, Chiris Cor- 
nille, Werner llic. ROW 3: Mike Winans, Ron Reagan, Vince 
Kerivan, Dove McDowell, Brian Stubitsch, Raphael Viton. Steve 
Melinauskas, James Mock, William Haddad, Tim Dolan, Tom 
Stahler. ROW 4: Ken Kolich, Tim Debarr, Steve Russell, Mark 
Kowalski, Ray Praski, Lenny Cyranek, Doug Walent, Mike Gal- 
legi. 



SECOND FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Joel Novak, Dwight Davis, Turner Goodwin, 
Adam Gedritis, Ed Janowiak, Mike Fuys, Pat King. Dave Ander- 
son, ROW 2: Bill Sullivan, Joe LaPorta, Travis Geddis, Dave Win- 
ograd, Scott Blasz, Tong Kim, ROW 3; Dan Keating, Joe 
Towers, Eli Gutierrez, Atiab Haddad, Joe Ringelstein, Mike Han- 
sen, Mike Petro, Tim Praski, Brent Yates, Pat Houle, ROW 4: Mike 
Ricciarelli, John Egofske, Dan Simanaitis, Tom Meinhart, John 
Waish, Ralph Ramirez. 



23 



Kohlbeck: 

IBC's 

Jungle 

Kohlbeck was also the place 
where the horseshoe fanatics all 
lived and the horseshoe pits had to be 
the best that IBC had to offer. Screens 
off the windows, speakers hanging out 
and music echoing off all of the build- 
ings were always a common sight. Peo- 
ple doing many various interests but all 
were commonly linked. Why?l Because 
of that beer each and everyone of 
them are holding. You could always 
hear, even above the echoing music, 
the voice of one of the third floor Kohl- 
beck girls. They always come in packs 
and could not be found without one 
another. Close friendships formed on 
the girls side of the third floor. The girls 
added a special touch to IBC most in- 
teresting and unique dorm. But even a 
more interesting touch was Father 
Ralph. He made Kohlbeck the place it 
was. 




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"The Kohlbeck Cuddle" is performed by Randy Pacana, Nora Crosson, Mary Pat 
Hurley and Tricia Airan (above). 

Who can say IBC students aren't conscience of world problems? Kohlbeck resi- 
dents show how they feel about Libya (right). 



24 



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Besides a place to live, Kohlbeck residents make money working 
as door guards, such as Anne Scherbarth (left). 

Taking time out from his duties as third floor R,A,, Gerry Mojerczyk 
(below) watches the homecoming football game 






K- Daffy 

EVEN IBC IS 
BIGGER THAN 

YOUR COUNTRY.'! 

I 




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KOHLBECK HALL 



THIRD FLOOR — GUYS 







FRONT ROW. James Ketchum, Vic Litwin, Frank Morsovillo, John 
Cooney, Steve Mueller ROW 2; James Kutilek. Yong Chon, 
Bob Ching, Tom Zak, Robert Agnoli ROW 3. Shawn Brown, 
Ernest Jaseckas, Todd Gramly, Paul Toussaint, Jeff McShane, 
Jim Gutt. 



THIRD FLOOR — GIRLS 




FRONT ROW: Jane Gilligan. ROW 2: Potti Farrell. Julie Link, Julie 
Notaro, Cora Guinta. ROW 3: Renee Herringer, Maria 
Stanglewicz, Anita Rutkowski. ROW 4: Lynette Kubik, Maureen 
Sullivan, Kristine Del Rose, Mary Schille, Laura Timoney, Anne 
Scherbarth. 



KOHLBECK STAFF 

E 




FRONT ROW: John Horton. ROW 2: Mike Fuys, Steve Melinaus- 
kas, Gerry Mojerczyk. ROW 3: Michelle Dixon, Counselor, Fa- 
ther Ralph. 



25 



Freedom 
Twenty-four 
Hours a Day 

Unlike the other dorms on campus, 
Neuzil Hall has twenty-four hour a 
day visitation rights. The suites alter- 
nate girls and guys. A family atmo- 
sphere prevails. There is never a dull 
moment. The former statements all de- 
scribe Neuzil Hall, IBC's only exclusively 
upperclassmen dorm houses about 200 
students. There is always something to 
do, whether it be studying, partying, 
visiting friends or even sleeping. Neuzil 
has it all. Many residents participate in 
intramurals, which vary from basketball 
to floor hockey to football to bowling. 
Parties are always frequent on week- 
ends, and spontaneous gatherings are 
more common during the week. Aside 
from all this, Neuzil also houses the year- 
book, RHA and SAB offices. The annual 
coffee house and movies entertain the 
whole campus. Twenty-four hours a 
day, seven days a week, there is some- 
thing for everyone! 



Sharing in botli good and bad times are Diane 
Mikulecky who helps Therese Block (above right) 
with an ice pack on her knee, 

A more re/axedfeeling frequently prevails in Neu- 
zil suites. Phil Moore (right) enjoys some time 
away from the books by playing his guitar. 



26 








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It's not all fun and games in Neuzil as Ginny Olson cuts Steve 
Camburn's hair (above) to earn a little extra money. 



Many Neuzil residents, such as Scott Novicki (below), enjoy the 
leisurely atmosphere of having a bar in their room. 




NEUZIL HALL 
FIRST FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Bill Wilder, Barb Colandrea, Jackie Daily, Edwin 
Sena, Leigh Thompson. ROW 2: Ricky Lugo, Cindy Indovina, 
Julie O'Connor, Igbal Khan, Diane DiPietro, Doug Walent. ROW 
3: Daryl Jones, Tom Scott, Jim Glimco, Carl Molyneaux, John 
Heriihy, Carolyn Lombardi, Sue Oswald, Paul Kozal, Ken Kozu- 
bowski, Chris Lesperance. ROW 4: Phil Moore, Pat Pericht, Mark 
Miklcsz, Nick Kugio, Bill McGuire. Ralph Loritz, Gerry Bedore, Ed 
Schmelzer, Tom White, Chris Gritting, Joe Marley. 



SECOND FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Sandy Ledova, Sue O'Brien, Mary Gorman, Jocile 
Walsh, Jill Spliterber, Ginny Olson ROW 2: Caryn Collins, Kerry 
Sugrue, Ruth Kubala, Alice Kubalo, Mary Kaye Leske, Lisa Yeh, 
Cindy Gorski, Laura Bernhard ROW 3: Maria Cordon, Patty 
Russell, Paul LaScala, Mayur Patel, Lisa Airan, Patty Donnelly, 
Teresa Miotke, Mark LeMonnier, Glen Jendra. ROW 4: Paul 
Tompulis, Peggy Perrone, Gregg Czerwinski. Rich Robertson, 
Potty Perrone, Don Weber, Michelle Rodzak, Scott Plaehn, 
Michael Ciofiletti, Don St, Germaine, Mark Phillips, Javier Pujols, 
Joe Kirchner, Ray Tarkowski. ROW 5: Alex Vrbanoff , Liz Dvorak, 
Bob Gerrltsen, Mark Pell, Jim Furio, Laura Cusack, Gary Jaku- 
bowski. 



27 



Is It 

Really 
Worth It? 

PARTY! A common phrase ringing 
througlnout Neuzil Hall. There was a 
party somewhere every weel<end. 
Even on weeknights, parties flourished. 
Seniors went to FAC and happy hours. 
Although there were quiet hours from 
1 1 :00 p.m. to 8:00 a.m. weekdays and 
2:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. on weekends, 
most residents found this hard to be- 
lieve. Elvis Wars were a common oc- 
currence all hours of the day or night. 
Other wierd noises echoed; bouncing 
basketballs, flying pans or some off the 
wall noise. Despite all this, Neuzil was a 
great place to live. The suites were 
spacious compared to the rest of the 
rooms on campus. Having a private 
bathroom was a luxury after two years 
of sharing. The lack of visitation hours 
was great too. No matter what time of 
day or night, fun was never too for 
away! 




28 





"I'm trying to study' Leave me alone!" exclaims Peggy Perrone 
(far above) while in the Neuzil lounge. 

Laughing, Mary Gorman (left) frantically searches for something in 
her purse. 

Wtiile trying to type his term paper, Paul Kozal (above) is interrupt- 
ed by another pesty photographer. 



NEUZIL HALL 



THIRD FLOOR 




FRONT ROW. Rose Pender, Ed Jurkovic, Larry LaLonde. Bill 
McGuire. Kothy Farrell, Bob Clark ROW 2: Elise Carbine, Cathy 
Hunt, Corrine Danhouer, Roseann Pumkin Dressel, Carolyn 
Gawrysh, Laura Mraz. ROW 3: Vince Notariano, Frank Ruff, Paul 
Anderson, Down Hinz, Nora Crosson, Bob Mertz. Jeanne Man- 
ning, Vince Zuppa, Ginny Gardner, Theresa Block, Carlo Gren- 
nan, Diane Mikulecky, Mary Svec. ROW 4: Rob Johnson, Dan 
Fondern, Vickie Miller, Maurice Bell, Don Sciakitano, Mark Pes- 
kor, Andy Skrobutt, Mike Menolosino. 



NEUZIL STAFF 




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FRONT ROW: Mark Stohs. Joanne Stohs, Kerry Sugrue, ROW 2: 
Jeremy Dobrowoiski, Dino Rumoro, Laura Mraz. 



29 



Making new friends is an important aspect of Ondrak living for Jocki Coler, Sangita 
Gaitonde, and Tina Mondelli (right). 



Welcome to 

A New and 

Different . . . 

Incoming freshmen girl's first stop at 
IBC is Ondrak Hall. This will be their 
home for the next two years. The 
newest dorm on campus houses under- 
class females. It is the nicest and most 
modern dorm on campus. Apprehen- 
sions soon disappear when the girls 
move in and feel the family atmo- 
sphere. RAs are friends and helpers, not 
someone to watch out for. Room- 
mates quickly become friends. Neigh- 
bors become friends. Everyone feels 
like one big happy family. Visitation 
hours might take a little getting used 
to, but most girls seem to like the time 
for privacy. Sophomores help the new- 
comers become accustomed to col- 
lege life: homework, classes, dorm 
food and parties. Because of the family 
atmosphere, the transistion is usually 
smooth and easy. 

Residents of Ondrak relax by the slough, as are 
Carolyn LaMargo and Kim Romano (right). 



Fun and frolic during an IBC weekend at Ondrak Hall for R.A.s Sandy Kozubowski 
and Laura Giancolo (right below). 

Gina Furio and Liz Ostrowski (below) prove that studying for final exams is a very 
serious task and requires some special props. 






30 





ONDRAK HALL 



FIRST FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Mary Maschek, Tracey Sheehan, Jacqueline 
Coler, Julie Hart. ROW 2: Kathy O'Brochta, Holly Juday, Mary 
Beth Kaye, Jeane Glenon. Jenny Rock, Josilyn Clesceri, Debbie 
Dalton, ROW 3: Marilyn Ejmo, Natalie Cappetta, Lori Moore, 
Ttieresa Kristopaitis, Karen Leick, Debbie Stalnaker ROW 4 
Laura Giacola, Chris Pease, Kathleen Mealy, Gayle Gallo, Ja- 
mie O'Connor, Nancy Brachle, Kathleen Walsh ROW 5: Laura 
O'Brien, Diane Ott, Joseph Coler, Madeline Monarty, Marquito 
Costello, Mary Ann Vacante, Carolyn Lamargo, Kathy Lu- 
tarewych. 



ONDRAK STAFF 




FRONT ROW: Christine Calzaretta, Kay Hetherington, Jake, 
Victoria Pietrygo. ROW 2: Mary Maschek, Kathy Weber, Sandy 
Kozubowski, Laura Giacola. 



31 



No 

More 

Singles 

As the years go on, some IBC girls 
stay in ttie comforts of Ondral<, 
Here, sophomore, junior and senior girls 
could get single rooms. A real luxuryl 
Some of these girls liked the privacy 
visitation hours provided, Some liked 
Ondrak since it v^/as relatively quiet. 
Some just liked a change after having 
a roommate. Close friends v^ere still 
next door. This v*/as the last year for this 
possibility. New rules state that there 
v^ill be no singles and only freshman and 
sophomore girls v\/ill be allowed in On- 
drak. Even with these changes, the 
family atmosphere will survive. Kay and 
Jake will remain. There will still be late 
night talks, walks by the slough and piz- 
za parties. Overall, Ondrak will go on as 
is, one big, happy family! I 




32 



Surprise' Terry Brachle (left) finds out that privacy while on the 
telephone is a rare thing. 

Studying together is important for some subjects. Jenny Rissl<y 
and her friend (below) put their heads together. 





"Darling, don't we look marvelous!" exclaims Turner Goodwin, 
Grovena McGee. and Monice Tyler (above), 

Ondrak residents (left) find out quickly where the nearest pizza 
places ore, and what dorm food really tastes like! 



ONDRAK HALL 



SECOND FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Kothy Weber, Sandy KozuPowski ROW 2, An- 
drea Dakuras, Teresa Brachle, ROW 3: Christine Vitale, Lori 
Weber, Stephanie Jones, Joan Severyns, Niki Kontogeorgis, 
Grovena McGee ROW 4: Tina Harper, Amy Britz, Kelly Block- 
well, Diane Simonaitis, Janet Erdman, Karen Kobal, Jennifer 
Strizek, Mary Melei, ROW 5: Monica Tyler, Joanne Yerkes, Jan- 
elle Dorsey, Lynda Fox, Diane Connolly, Elizabeth Morquordt, 
Andrea Manlik, Sherri Cross, Kathy Lillig, Mary Rose Vokurka. 



THIRD FLOOR 




FRONT ROW: Jacqueline Haeflinger, Gigi Garreil. ROW 2: Joy- 
cie Watson, Kathleen McAuliffe ROW 3: Theresha Johnson, 
Jeanne Hnilicko, Catherine Hammes, Karen Walsh, Joanne Bill- 
ings, Jenny Rissky, Angelica Klablisch. ROW 4: Stacey Altpeter. 
Dorothy Thomas, Gino Dado, Anita Peters, Vicky Grodesky, 
Tricia Heywood, ROW 5: Cathy Nogd, Connie Ziccarelli, Potty 
Foley, Phciila Nkemdi, Camda Temmens, Deonno Stephens, 
Ann Benesh, Mary Suter, 



33 



Life As 
A Commuter 



Are you a commuter or resident? Whiy do you 
commute? Do you regret commuting? These 
ore common questions whicli are asked of IBC stu- 
dents. Answers to ttie second question may vary 
withi reasons due to expenses, work or even residen- 
tial location. As for tiie regrets of commuting, well, 
the extent of them is the hassle of travelling. Other- 
wise, commuters are satisfied with the opportunity 
to participate in and become involved with most 
school activities. Commuters and residents are very 
much alike in that they can get out of their college 
life what they put into it. 

Francine Gadzala (right) appears to be hiding the evidence 
which she has used to influence Nancy Ghanoyem. 






When observing the early morning rush to classes, notice that the 
students with their eyes open are the commuters (above). 



Joe Coscino (above), IBC's resident-commuter, could never decide 
which lifestyle he prefers. 



34 



Barb O'Palka and Lisa Natale (left) defend their com- 
muter tionor. 

The pub atmosphere keeps Ptiii Stril<er wide awake 
while he finishes some last minute homework 




Dave Terrell. David McKeehan, and Mike Winkler (below) partici- 
pate in one of the funfilled activities involving the advisory groups. 



In The 
Beginning 



The time had arisen again for upperclassmen to 
serve as Orientation Assistants during freshmen 
orientation week. Their goal was helping the incom- 
ing freshmen to overcome any fear, doubts, or con- 
fusion, to get them psyched for college life and, of 
course, orientate them with IBC. The week before 
classes resumed, in the fall, was dedicated to mak- 
ing freshmen comfortable. 

During this week, the freshmen met with advisory 
groups, took placement exams, and registered for 
their first semester classes, The week was not devot- 
ed to all work and no play. Activities such as an ice 
cream social, a pig roast, a pub party, and pool 
party gave the freshmen a chance to meet each 
other and mingle with the upperclassmen. At the 
conclusion of the week, the freshmen had the op- 
portunity to go home for the weekend or attend a 
picnic at Blackwell Lake, 

Apparently, orientation week served its purpose 
well because when classes did resume, the freshmen 
seemed quite comfortable, and of course, 
psyched. 





VInce Becker, Rita Walsh, Nancy and Maria Ghanayem (above) 
take note of the festivities during the welcoming picnic of orien- 
tation week. 



36 



Mike Fuys (below) commends John Norton on his outstanding 
behavior with the freshmen. 





DPSWitM^^cC, 



./ 



^ 



f 





^f^'^ENCE LIFE 





(?£SipENCf i;f£ 



Don Sciakitano (above) awaits the freshmen and their parents on 
the first day of orientation. 

Steve Camburn andDr Becker (left) discuss the upcoming events 
which are in store for IBC's new freshmen class. 



37 




Three beautiful girls (well, maybe two) (above) grace the lime- 
light at the Halloween Pub party. 



38 




"Let me figure that out for you!" explains Brian Brieske (above), 
showing his true "nerdy" self. 

Dancing at the Halloween Party are Joe Laporta, Greg Kirwan, 
and Rose Pender (below). 




All Ghoul's Day 



Once upon a haunted eve, all the little IBC stu- 
dents put on their costumes and scurried ott 
to the Eagle's Nest for a rocking good time. Like 
previous Halloweens, the Eagle's Nest was convert- 
ed into a haven for the costumed students. Mike 
Murray once again provided the tunes for every- 
one's dancing pleasure. Creativity flowed in the 
form of costumes. There were ghouls, clowns, pi- 
rates, sports people, and even some outfits that 
were more unique and original. The beer flowed 
readily, and the spirits of the spirits lifted. By the end 
of the evening, all the tired ghouls could float bock 
to their dorms or houses. Only the real spirits re- 
mained out until the wee hours of the morning. The 
magic had ended until next end, but don't worry my 
little IBC ghouls, that spirit shall return, as it does every 
year on all ghoul's day. 




l-larpo Marx Joel Olytan and tennis star Nicole Stanford make a 
cute (?) couple at the bash (above). 



39 



Bill Moran (right) shows his true showbiz nature as he emcees for 
the Neuzil Coftee House for the second year. 

Ondrak residents (far below) keep dry while dreams of being the 
next "Love Boat" mermaids swim through their heads. 

Jane Giiligan and Julie Notaro (below) do a short but funny skit for 
the Coffee House. 





Dorms 
Sponsor Events 

The dorms at IBC are not just places used by 
some students to sleep in, they ore also places 
for many activities, whether private or school spon- 
sored and most importantly, they are a great way 
to meet people. Events for residents only ranged 
from donut or pizza parties at Ondrak to Jaeger 
dinner parties to Kohlbeck picnics to ice cream sun- 
dae day at Neuzil. There were other interdorm 
events also such as the Ondrak/Jaeger pool party 
where Ondrak and Jaeger residents had a great 
time meeting each other by watching "Jaws" in the 
pool. These dorm events also include activities in 
which the whole campus could get involved in. One 
activity in this respect, that has been held each year 
for three years now is the Neuzil Coffee House. This is 
one event where talented students and faculty per- 
form for the school at large. 




How do you build a pyramid in the poo!? Joeger/Ondrakians 
(above) have a pretty good start, 

Linda Zee and her date (above left), getting ready for the On- 
drak/Jaeger pool party 

Kay Hetherington (left) strums the old banjo and sings at the 
Coffee House vi^ithout her tobacco. 



41 



Guild 
Goes Cuckoo 

Weeknights in October and November heard 
a loud and different kind of noise coming 
from thie Social Center. Pounding hammers, paint- 
ing, stapling and music to accompany it all filled 
Benedictine Hall. Why? Once again this year. The- 
ater Guild was putting on a fall ploy, "One Flew Over 
The Cuckoo's Nest" by Dole Wosserman. This was 
the guilds' third production, and since being reorga- 
nized in 1983, the size of the guild has doubled. 

Once again the cast doubled as the crew, and 
some newcomers joined the group to experience 
what being on stage or back stage was really like. 
After six painstaking weeks of rehearsal, and not to 
mention a few all-nighters to finish the stage for 
opening night, the show went on Thursday, Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday November 7, 8, 9, and 10. It 
was the most successful production in terms of at- 
tendance. Everyone involved hod a wonderful feel- 
ing of accomplishment afterwards and celebrated 
appropriately at some of the infamous cast parties. 
The parties are a large part of Theater Guild tradi- 
tion. A tradition to hopefully live on for a while at IBC. 

Nurses Racket and Flynn, played by Beth Kopulos and Beth Schultz 
(above right), discuss the patients on the ward. 

Carefully applying make-up to darl<en Bob Krupp's sl<in, Kari Daly 
(right) does her part for the guild backstage. 

Cleaning the ward in the morning are guards Ed Janowiak and 
Joe Coscino (below) until it is spotless and shines. 






\ 



Pulling his usual stunts. MacMurphy John 
Norton talks to Guard Joe Coscino (left). 

Demonstrating tiow to be nailed to a cross 
is Ttieater Guild Director Gerry Majerczyk 
(below). 




Goofing around bacl< stage is just as much 
fun as acting for Bob Agnoli (above) 

Listening to ottier patients are Dr Spivey 
Vikki Vlastnik and MacMurphy John Horton 
(left). 



Mike Petro (below) is one party goer who takes advantage of the 
opportunity to see friends Barb O'Palko and Lisa Natale^ 



Pub Parties: 
A Last Resort 

Weekends are great to: catch up on much 
deserved sleep, attempt to do the home- 
work that should have been done lost weekend, visit 
friends, play tricks on enemies, or go to an IBC ~'Pub 
Party." Pub parties at IBC occur almost every week- 
end and have a variety of themes; most of these 
parties are skipped probably for one of the other 
reasons above. There are, however, some pub par- 
ties that no one would dare skip. To start off the year 
right, most students decide to go the first pub party 
of the year. This is a good time to see old friends who 
were never contacted over the summer, to meet 
new friends, to check out the competition, or to 
"pick up" some unsuspecting freshman. One of the 
other big pub parties the Halloween Costume Party, 
which is the best chance of the year to see what 
everyone actually looks like. The first pub party of 
the spring semester attracts a good crowd for no 
other reason than the lack of anything better to do. 
The lost of the great pub parties is the Hawaiian 
Beach Party sponsored the Commuter Club, the 
French Club, and the Spanish Club. This is a great 
reason to break out the summerwear in the middle 
of winter and have a terrific time. 

A pub party is a time spent well with good friends (right). 




44 



Kim Romano (below) and her unidentifiable friend switch roles at 
the Halloween Costume Party, 




45 



Where's 
The Beach? 

At the start of March, a contagious ailment was 
floating around IBC's campus. A few of the 
many symptons included skipping classes, not study- 
ing, enjoying the outdoors, and going to tanning 
spas. The infection was the result of spring and spring 
break being just around the corner. The disease was 
none other than Spring Fever and the antidote was 
the infamous Hawaiian Beach Party. 

On March 15, a week before vacation was to 
begin, the Commuter Association, the French Club, 
and the Spanish Club sponsored the annual Hawai- 
ian Beach Party. To accommodate the theme of this 
pub party, the Eagle's Nest was colorfully decorated 
with balloons, streamers, and summer ornaments. 
Each attendee was welcomed at the door and re- 
ceived a lei to insure the Hawaiian image of the 
party. This pub party was no doubt the most exciting 
of the year and, of course, the one with the most 
attendees. 

Not only did this party serve as a cure for spring 
fever, it also initiated Spring 1986 for the students at 
IBC. 




Shawn Mares (above) finds the beach party the perfect time to 
tall< to Brad Cerocl<e about her exciting Spring Break plans — a 
trip to Florida. 




There's nothing like a nighttime beach party to prepare one for 
the excitement of spring break '86 (above). 



46 



Sangifa Gaitonde, Joe Santucci. Tracey Sheehan and friend, 
Jacqueline Coler, and Tina Mondelli (below) have their own spring 
celebration party prior to the one held in the oub. 




Kathleen Healy, Jeanine O'Conner. and Jenny Rocl< (above) just 
had to get out of Ondrak because "Surf's Up!' 

Nancy Zampa, Jim Evanish, and Potti Panek (left) display the 
typical attire at the Hawaiian Beach Party 



47 



Bears 

Take On 

Lisle Locals 

/ / ^ uperbowl champs at IBC? Could it be true 
i3 or even possible?" The ariswer to this 
thought which ran through the minds of many indi- 
viduals was "Yes." On March 7, 1986, the Chicago 
Bears sent a few of their players to pose as the Good 
News Bears in a basl<etball game against some Lisle 
locals. Among these shuffling Bears were Calvin 
Thomas and Tyrone Keys and among the Lisle locals 
were Carol Nadolski. Ray Nutter, Coach Dave 
Egofske, and Coach John Ostrowski, as the referee. 

This event sponsored by the Business Club, was the 
biggest event of the school year. Faculty, students 
with their families, and DuPage County residents filed 
into the rice center for the second most talked 
about gome around IBC. Of course, the superbowl 
was the most talked about. 

Although, more popular bears such as Walter Pay- 
ton and William Perry did not participate, the game 
was still a success. The Bears barely beat the Lisle 
locals with a score of 69-67. Even though the Good 
News Bears were victorious at the Basketball game, 
it was apparent to the public that the Superbowl 
Champs should stick to football, 





IBC students were caught betraying ttieir community and cheer- 
ing on the Good News Bears (above) 



48 



Not even a bear could stand in the way of a Lisle Local (left). 




Coach John Ostrowski (above), ttie game referee, made no 
exceptions for ttie speciol guests. Every one had to comply w/ith 
the rules or suffer the consequences. 




Who is that masked bear shooting from just inside the side lines 
(above)? 



The Bears made the night a memorable one for many fans by 
signing autographs (above). 



49 



Taking a break from the dorms, Junior Scholar Therese Block (be 
low) studies in the great outdoors. 




A sunny Saturday afternoon finds Theresa Kristopaitis and Holly 
Juday (above) enjoying the Scholar's Picnic 

Modeling furs at the IBC World ot Polo in Oak Brook are Junior 
Scholars Scott Plaehn and Lisa Airan (right). 



50 





IBC's Mensas 

Many IBC students associate the Scholar's Or- 
ganization with just a bunch of brainy, elitest 
students. However the program is a far cry from this 
description. Even though the members of the orga- 
nization must meet certain requirements pertaining 
to scholastic achievement, school involvement, and 
leadership ability, the scholars still know how to have 
fun. This year, aside from the annual Second City 
outing and the trip to Colorado, the scholars did a 
variety of fun things such as the first annual Senior 
Roast Picnic, Also on the agenda was a luncheon 
and fashion show at the Oak Brook Polo Club. Many 
of the scholars participated in modeling furs from 
York Furrier in Elmhurst as they rode around the polo 
grounds in classic antique cars. When not wearing 
furs, the scholars also painted and redecorated the 
scholars lounge on the second floor of Benedictine 
Hall, New and exciting things were happening to IBC 
scholars all the time as the program concluded it's 
fifth year. 

Enjoying the porch by Paradise Hall for some of tfie last times are 
Scholar's Vince Becker and Jim Widlowski (above left), 

Reading Senior Awards at thie r?oast is Schiolar's Organization 
Ctiairman Mike Menolasino (below left). 

Wishing the coats and ttie car were ttieirs to keep ore Lisa Yeh 
and Vince Becker (below) at ttie World of Polo, 




51 




Pointing out to the photographer where we 
ore is John Kozol (above) 

Danc/ng on f^e cA)o//-s at the party are Vince „ , . „ , , ,^ , . ^,. x ., ^^ 

„„^, „ ^^« ^ I N,i ■ 4. / J, KiN C/ieers Anne Scherbarth (right) salutes a great day of fun 

Becker and Madeline Monarty (above right). v a ; a r 

^ *=* ^ while on the IBC ski Trip. 



52 




Hitting 
The Slopes 

A cold February day with no classes means 
what? It must be time for the annual IBC Ski Trip 
to Americana Resort in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, This 
year's turn out was bigger than ever. Over 250 peo- 
ple went on the trip. Beginners had the opportunity 
to take lessons. Moderate skiers had a good variety 
of slopes to chose from , Advanced skiers showed off 
on the tougher hill. For some of them, it was a piece 
of cake and they made it look much too easy. The 
partying started as soon as the buses pulled out of 
Neuzil's parking lot. 

After a long day of skiing, the really partying be- 
gan at the resort. The beer and pizza party was a 
great time for all. A DJ played lots of good music and 
all the weary skiers took to the dance floor. Some 
explored the resort, and even tried some of the res- 
taurants, bars and snack areas. At 11;30, the buses 
were loaded for the trip back to IBC, Some had 
energy to party yet, but most slept. When back 
home, the exhausted skiers went on their ways, al- 
ways keeping the memories of another successful 
IBC Ski Trip. 

Falling down is all part of learning to ski as Jim Kutiiek (left) demon- 
strates during a lesson on the bunny hill, 

A happy foursome at Americana, Corolyn LoMargo, Brian Brieske, 
Kim Romano, and Kim McDonald (below) 




V 







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> 




53 



Q 



People Who 
Really Care 

uestion: What is CMC? a.) a new type of 
car b.) a new compound the chemistry 
department discovered that does everything but 
cure the common cold? c.) The latest dish on 
Saga's menu standing for cold meatball casse- 
role d,) The abbreviation for the Campus Ministry 
Center. Answer; The correct answer is d.) The ab- 
breviation for the Campys Ministry Center. So 
what does the Campus Ministry Center do? It is 
more than a place for Father Ralph, the director, 
to rest his feet; the Campus Ministry Center is the 
root from which many fine school programs have 
sprouted from. A few of the programs are: Be-A- 
Buddy, students from the school volunteer to help 
take core of children of working parents; Senior 
Citizen Outreach Program, participants visit the 
elderly in a nursing home; Epiphany, the school's 
traveling singing group; and TREC, a program in 
which participants talk to the boys at the Volley- 
view Correctional Center. The Campus Ministry 
Center also is the place to go when help is need- 
ed, whether it is a ride to the doctor or a friendly 
face to talk to. So what is the CMC? It is the 
"heart" of IBC. 

Members of Campus Ministry (right) decorate a tree in the 
Chapel in a celebration of Lent 

Performing in the Eagle 's Nest for the IBC community are mem- 
bers of Epiphany (below). 





^Vb 



i 



Baccalaureate Mass was another time for Epiphany to perform. Maria 
Stanglewicz (left) plays the flute during the mass. 

Kids in the B-A-Buddy program tour IBC's campus, like a stop in the Residence 
Life Office and a talk from Dr. Bell (below). 




EUCHARISTIC MINISTERS — FRONT ROW: Ginny Olson, Corrine Danhauer, Mari- 
anne Hedin, Kerry Sugrue. ROW 2 Laura Giancola, Mary Gorman, Jeanne 
Hmilicka, Mark Miklosz, Joe Santucci, Phil Moore, Ed Schmelzer, Dino Rumuro, 
Laura Mraz, Laura Bernhard, Edwin Send, Dan Kemp, Rev. Mark Waltz 




Campus Ministry Members and the IBC community enjoy a Sunday afternoon 
performance on Epiphany in the Eagle's Nest (above). 

Participating in flie Sunday Recreation Program is Beth Kopulos and her little 
sister (left) 



55 



Family Ties _ 



Parental involvement in IBC life comes in on as- 
sortment of Vi/ays; two great ways each year to 
get parents up to school are the Mother/Daughter 
Brunch and the Father/Daughter Dinner Dance, 

The Mother/Daughter Brunch was, as always a 
special day for mothers and daughters to share hugs 
and happy moments while they ate, laughed and 
met new faces. The event is sponsored each year 
by Ondrak RHA and it is catered by SAGA, the 
school's food service. The annual Father/Daughter 
Dinner Dance not only provided a chance to trip the 
light fantastic with Dad, but also gave a chance to 
share fond memories and funny antics of of family life 
with friends. The Social Center was filled with smiles 
and warm feelings as fathers and daughters en- 
joyed each others company. Whether it was the 
Mother/Daughter Brunch or the Father/Daughter 
Dinner Dance or both, the women of IBC had some 
great chances to get the parents involved. 




A warm hug from her daughter Mary Suter (above) will enhance '** 

Mrs. Suter's memories of the brunch. 



Not only mothers and daughters, but friends too! Good friends Jill 
Vest and Sandy Kozubowski pose with their moms (right). 



56 





Sharing good times at the bruncti are Dawn Hinz 
and Gina Furio and ttieir moms (left). 

A snapshot full of memories from the brunch for 
Lisa Airan and her mother (below). 




Enjoying each other's company ate Patty Russell 
and her dad (above) at the dinner dance. 



57 



students got to participate in Jim Belushi's taik "The Art of 
improvisation" (ieft) 

"You put your right arm in!" during the Hokey-Pokey at 
IBC's Polko Party (beiow). 




Faculty members (above) iaugh and drink it up at the annuai Poika 
Party v^/hiie posing for the camera. 

Second City Member Chris Barnes (right) invades the audience dur- 
ing a sketch and gets everyone invoived in the act. 



58 





Something 
For Everyone 

What do you do on weekends? Well, if you're 
lucky there may be something besides a pub 
party. This year there were some other alternatives: 
Second City, the Polka Party and Jim Belushi. Second 
City stopped at IBC on October 19th on their anni- 
versary tour. The Chicago based comedy group 
does improvisotional comedy that relates life exper- 
iences and uses irony extensively. The Polka Party is 
an annual event for not only the IBC community, but 
people of the surrounding areas. Students and fac- 
ulty members found out how fun polkaing can be. 
On a more serious (?) side, Jim Belushi appeared at 
IBC in April. The appearance was billed "The Art of 
Improvisation". It turned out to be very informal, with 
Belushi fielding questions from the crowd with quick 
responses, often with a wit that demonstrated his 
skills in improvisation better than any lecturer could. 
Even of IBC, weekends showed that there was 
something for everyone. 

Not quite doing ttie poll<a is Maureen Sullivan (above left) as the 
music changed beats at the Polka Party. 

Jim Belushi (betovj left) uses the Candor for material during part of 
his act at IBC last April, 

Crew members of Second City (below) discuss the set-up to be 
used during the performance at IBC 




59 



Spring Fever 

Medically, there Is no known cure for "spring 
fever" but the Spring Semi-Formal Dance 
can help alleviate some of the symptoms. This year, 
once again, the semi-formal was coordinated by 
the Commuters Association, headed by Dulce Frial. 
Over two hundred victims of "spring fever" came 
to Ripples, in Darlen, to dance away the "fever", 
The champagne fountain and hors' doeuvres were 
the first dose of "medication" and the open bar was 
another step toward a cure. Dinner consisted of a 
refreshing fruit cup, spinach salad that could tempt 
the tastebuds of Popeye, and tender, juicy filet mig- 
non all topped off with a mint Ice cream dessert. 
With dinner complete, couples danced away the 
"fever" to the great music supplied by a D.J. There 
were old and new favorites. Something for every 
kind of music liking. Slow romantic songs let couples 
get close. The upbeat tempo then had everyone on 
their feet and dancing to the music. Each girl re- 
ceived a rose when she entered and each couple 
received a pair of long stemmed glasses to remem- 
ber the evening by. Memories were also collected 
by all. The magic ended about 1:00 a.m. with the 
last of the partlers leaving. Were these victims cured 
of their "spring fever"? By the smiles on their faces, it 
certainly seemed that once again the Spring Semi- 
Formal Dance did the job of curing the "fever". 

Carolyn Gawrysh and Jeff Jankowski (above right): another hap- 
py couple, thanks to IBC 

Mike lV/ni</er (right) shows his girlfriend Jill Baaske that he is a really 
"schweetie". 

No ttiese seniors are not gambiing (below), they ore really at- 
tempting to dance at the Semi-Formal. 





60 




Jim Furio and Greg Suter (far above) have discovered too late 
that using a camera is more complicated than they can handle. 

Lisa Yeh, LisaAiran. Vikki Vlastnik and Cindy Gorski (above) show- 
ing off Tom's latest haircuts. 

Greg Suter (right) shovi/s he finally discovered how to put the film 
in the camera and use it. 



61 



CLUBS 




I 






Imitating a prospective student, Doug Beran is informed about the Chemistry 
and Biochemistry Departments from ACS member Madeline Moriarty (above). 



Posing as Richard M. Nixon and staff are Tom Flynn, 
Barb Ebert, Paul Tompulis, Gregg Czerwinski and Bob 
Gerritsen (above). 

SAB sponsored tiypnotist has Julie Roti (left) under his 
spell. 



63 



EAGLE i 
CANDOR i 

Reading the Trib fo get ideas for the Candor are 
Stacy Altepeter and Chris Lobello (right). 





CANDOR STAFF — FRONT ROW: Joel Oltyon, ROW 2: Dr. Peter Seely, 
Adv.; Stacy Altepeter, Vickie Pietryga, Jenny Rissky, Holly Juday, Pat 
Murray. ROW 3: Joe Sontucci, Niki Kontogeorgis, Annette Bartoszek, 
Rodell Holly, Vince Becker, Artistotle Kornaros, Chris LoBello, Jim Kutiiek, 
Pat Decraene. 




Caught while writing copy is Edwin Sena (above), one of 
the few yearbook staff. 

Brainstorming sessions ore a common occurence in journal- 
ism. The Candor (above right) partakes in one. 

After a good brainstorming session, Aristotle Kornaeos, Jill 
Kutiiek, Vince Becker, Joel Oltyan and Rodell Holly (right) 
celebrate. 



64 







/t 





CANDOR AND EAGLE PHOTOGRAPHERS — Joe San- 
tucci, Dan Kemp, and Vince Becker, 



65 




Voting for Homecoming Courtis Mark Le Monnier (above), while SAB represen- 
tatives Kothy Weber and Kattiy Forrell supervise ttie election. 








66 




SAB 

FRENCH CLUB 



SAB President J\m Glimco (left) poses stately for a 
yearbook phiotographer. 







Ac^r 



""7in"iTlirir''ir*'' 



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FRENCH CLUB — FRONT ROW Diane Connelly, Marianne Hedin, Holly Juday, Jenny 
Struzik, Connie Nickels. Mayur Potel, Edwin Sena, Pres,; Carmela Bartucci, Mictiael 
Cioffoletti. Joe Coler, 



French Club members become good friends too, 
like Joe Coler and Laurie Paul (above). 

Students, such as Jeanne Manning and John Mor- 
ton (above left) hiad fun at ttie French Club 
Beach Party. 

Once again the SAB sponsored hypnotist had 
students doing "strange things", (left). 



67 



ITALIAN CLUB 
SPANISH CLUB 



Spanish Club Member Gina Dado (right) is sur- 
prised wlien the camera catches her with Italian 
food. 





SPANISH CLUB — FRONT ROW: Lisa Yeh, Pres,; Mark Zullo, Vice Pres,; Bob Ching, 
Treas.; Liz Ostrowski, Sec. ROW 2: Roxonne Sookdeo, Joanne Brozovich, Tina 
Harper, Linda Zee, Gina Dado, Joycie Watson, Marilu Dela Cruz, Dr. Luz Aiveroz, 
Adv.; Mayur Potel, /?OlV3, Kevin Czerok, Aristotle Kornaros, Iqbal Khan, Ricky Lugo, 
Dave Sudzus. 




Selling bakery for Spanish Club to raise money is 
Marilu Dela Cruz (above). 



68 








ITALIAN CLUB — FRONT ROW: Joe Santucci, Linda Zee, Frank Morsovillo, Mary 
Melei, Carmelo Bartucci. Chris Vitale, Dulce Frial, Lisa Natale. Tina Mondelli, ROW 2: 
Jim Glimco. Tony Menolascino, Vince Pollastnni, Edwin Sena, Michael Cioffolettl. 



Lesiurely reading some foreign material is Ricky 
Lugo (far above) 

All nationalities tiad fun at the Spanish Club co- 
sonsored Beach Party (above) 



69 




INTERNATIONAL CLUB — FRONT ROW: Marilu Dela Cruz, Bob Ching, Yong Chon, Johnny Koo, 
Sanjay Dhutia, ROW 2: Mary Swonson, Marianne Hedin, Roxanne Sookdo. Joanne Brozovich, 
Voraporn Wanadit, Sheena Rahman, Lisa Yeh, Anna Ottolin, Adv. ROW 3. Kip Ropl<oy, Mark 
Zullo, Iqbal Khan, Aristotle Kornaros, Dave Sudzus, Ricky Lugo, Baljit Deol. 




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70 



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MUSIC CLUB 
THEATER GUILD 
INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



Sandy and Candi Anne Scherbarth and Julie No- 
taro (left) pose for thie camera 





International Club Members Yong Chion and Johnny Koo 
(above) discuss upcoming events 

Nurse Racket and patients (Betli Kopulos, Bob Agnoli and 
Al Izzo) (above left) discuss mental problems. 

Helping backstage is Connie Nicl<ols (far left), who applies 
make-up to Joe Coscino 

The Pep Band (left) raises spirits by playing at the Home- 
coming Football Gome 



71 



MATH CLUB 

COMMUTER 

ASSOCIATION 



Posing proudly in her NASA jacket is Math Club 
President Merry Jirl<a (right). 





COMMUTER ASSOCIATION — FRONT ROW: Jill Splitberger, Jill Vest. ROW 2: Diane 
Connolly, Michael Cioffoletti, Debbie Dolansky, Sheila Berkes. ROW 3: Sondy Kozu- 
bowski, Joanne Brozovich, Dulce Frial, Morilu DelaCruz, Sue Wong, Sheery Cross. ROW 
4 Cheryl Batts, Julie Bollard, Rick Homel, Mike Fortuna, 




72 




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MA rHC/.(J6 — F/?0/vr/?0tV; Jenny Rissky.Vice-Pres.: Meredith Jirka.Pres; Diane 
Frieders, ROW 2: Jean Gobert, Diane DiPietro, Dr. James Meehon. Adv. ROW 3: 
Jack Tucker, Michael Olenek, Steve Martin, Paul Toussaint, 



Math Club member Diane DiPietro (above) helps Jeff 
Kosobucki with some problems. 

Memories of the Spring Semi-Formal, courtesy of the 
Commuter Association (above left). 

Students dance the night away (left) at the Com- 
muter Association Spring Semi-Formal 



73 




ACS officers, past and present, Dave Slinkman, Vikki Vlastnik and Rich An- 
derson (above) pose at the ACS Banquet 



Trying tiis aim at a dunk tank ACS sponsored during homecoming week is 
Gerry Majerczyk (above right). 



Blue Key member Marianne Hedin (below right) takes some time away from 
the books at the Scholar's Picnic. 



74 





ACS 
BLUE KEY 



Showing that honor society members are not al- 
ways serious, Froncine Godzola (left) models 

stickers 




Supervising the ACS Magic Shiow for high 
school students is Dr. Wayne Wesolowski 
(above right). 

Professor George Bodner (for above) of 
Purdue Univ. gave the guest presentation 
at the ACS Banquet. 

ACS members Doug Beran and Melissa 
Trok (above) talk in the science center. 



75 



PHYSICS CLUB , 
BIOCHEMISTRY CLUB / 



Advisor of the Biochem Club, Dr, Ed Ferroni (right) 
grimaces at the cart of chemicals. 





' tPir- 



PHYSICS CLUB — FRONT ROW. Merry Jirka, Jock Tucker, Dr, Joseph Bowe, 
Adv. ROW 2: Tim Anderson, Ion Zaenger. 



76 




I 




Displaying her biochemistry research on calcium preference in rats at an open 
tiouse for liigh school students is Carolyn Gawrysh (above). 



Biochem major Mayur Patel (above) describes a 
UV/VIS spectrophotometer for some high schoolers. 

At the Physics Awards Banquet, Merry Jirka (above 
left) is acknowledged for her internship at NASA, 

Figuring out centripetai acceleration is Tong Kim 
(left) during Experimental Physics, 



77 



SPORTS 




Quickly outmaneuvehng an onslaught of opponents, Travis 
Geddis (above) pushes forward for yardage. 



Grimace on the face of Larry LaLonde (left) exemplifies the ^^• 
determination of the new Soccer Team, *>»-'■- 



I 

■ 

I 
J 

P 

I 
I 




IBC Eaglettes and Cheerleaders (abo'je) eagerly await the arrival of the 
Football Eagles on the field for the "Glory Days" Homecoming Game, 



79 



Newcomers 

IBC's newest varsity team did not end 
up with a winning season, but they did 
make a mark. Steve Davidson recorded 
IBC's first goal ever on September 12th 
against St. Francis. On October 19th, 
Mark Klimek booted the winner in the 3-2 
overtime win at Carthage College. Baljit 
Deol topped all Eagles scorers, recording 
4 of the nine goals and assisting on the 
remaining five. Coach Paul Wardlow was 
very optimistic and hopes to win many 
more games next year. He felt the team 
showed much improvement, especially in 
the last four games. One thing on the 
newcomers side, they only lost two play- 
ers to graduation, 

Goalie Jeremy Dobrowolski (right) handles the ball 
for a picture as well as he handles it in a game. 

1985 SOCCER — FRONT ROW: Mark Klimek, Dave 
McKeehan, Manish Dhukla. /?OlV2, Sonjoy Dhuklo. Ed 
Jurkovic, Lorry LoLonde, Mike Menolasino, Kevin 
O'Keefe, Jeff Steinbeck. ROW 3: Coach Paul Ward- 
law, Mike Winkler, Dove Terrell, Jeremy Dobrowolski, 
Steve Davidson, Baljit Deol, Larry Pietryga. 



1985 SOCCER RECORD 


IBC 


OPP 


Lake Forest 





1 


St. Francis 


2 


4 


DePaul 





4 


Carthage 





1 


North Park 


1 


5 


IIT 


1' 


4 


Rockford 





2 


Chicago State 


1 


6 


Judson 





5 


Aurora 





1 


Carthage 


3 


2 


Trinity Christian 








North Central 


1 


3 


Trinity 





1 



IBC Soccer team (right) using everything they have, 
including their heads. 



80 












Beating his opponents. Beljit Deol (above) races 
downfield with the boll showing the determina- 
tion and aggressiveness of the new IBC Soccer 
Team 

With the aid of his fleeting speed and sl<ili, Mike 
Winkler (left) aggressively out races a Carthage 
opponent and keeps the ball for the Eagles. 



i 



81 



Just Short Of First Down V 



The continued resurgence of the Illi- 
nois Benedictine football team led to 
their .500 record during the 1985 season. 
As the season progressed, and with the 
leadership of team captains Marl< Laurich, 
Steve Camburn, and Tom Cole, the team 
showed definite improvements both of- 
fensively and defensively. Head Coach Bill 
Barz saw scoring, consistency and rushing 
as significant areas of improvement. 

The Eagles not only showed improve- 
ment during the 1985 season, they also 
displayed improvement from the previous 
year. The team averaged 25 points per 
game this season, which was seven points 
better than 1984. Also during this season, 
the Eagles doubled their 1984 rushing 
yardage. 

The 5-5 record was achieved in the final 
game, which was a season highlight. Con- 

1985 FOOTBALL — FRONT ROW: Tonas Johnson, Tre- 
vor Averett, Dove Lifka, Doug Walent, Scott Bur- 
andt, Scott Blosz. Rot Viton, Ralph Ramirez, Mike Gal- 
lagher, ROW 2: Lenny Cyronek, Glenn Zimlich. Bill 
Sheridan. Tim Ryan, John Korpowicz, Ron Ruffin, Tom 
White. Travis Gaddis, Tim Sebold, Don Johnson. Andy 
Hoffman. ROW 3: Mike Brzecek, Pat Pericht, Mike Mc- 
Kenna, Mike Cadman, Tom Huffman, Mark Laurich, 
Steve Camburn, Tom Cole, Jack Golden, Jeff 
McKendry, John Brady. ROW 4: Pat Lynch, Tad Nel- 
mark, Tim Davy, Greg Novak, Jack Pivac. Mark 
Lesch, Jim Stefo. Doug Smith, Dave Dominiak, Tate 
Nelmark, Paul Taylor, ROW 5: Linos Kostys, John Siper- 
ly, Brian Baker-Watson, Brett Koehler. Pat Ward, Joe 
Marley. Martin Daley. Mike Lesch. ROW 6: Ed McMa- 
hon. Bill Smith, John Plys. Mike Rothman, Barry Cotes. 
Brent Yates, Tim Hall. Marty Byrne, Jerry Barker, Mar- 
tin McGrail, Kevin Leighty. ROW 7: Bill Smith. Mike 
Hansen, Tom Meinhort, Kevin Lind, Brian Stubitsch. 
Mike Range, Andy Barber. Werner llic. Chris Capps. 
Mike Retro, Joe Okopski. Ernie Sutton, ROW 8: John 
Ostrowski, Tom O'Connor, Mike Stine, Rick Voughan. 
Jim Sullivan, Bill Barz (Head Cooch). Dove Egofske, 
Jim Finnerty. Tom Beshora. Steve Nickl. 



cordia, which was ranked second for both 
offense passing and total offense in 
NCAA — Division III national statistics, fell 
prey to the IBC Eagles for a final score of 
42-0. 

The Eagles' continuing prosperity 
throughout the season and over the year 
presents IBC fans with an optimistic out- 
lool< of the success to come in 1986. 




1985 FOOTBALL RECORD 


IBC 


OPP 


North Central 


22 


28 


Elmhurst 


17 


24 


Kalamazoo 


45 


23 


North Park 


35 


7 


Olivet Nazarene 


30 


6 


Loros 


9 


10 


St, Ambrose 


19 


35 


Wheaton 


28 


21 


Augustana 


3 


41 


Concordia 


42 







%MJiM 




82 



Trevor Averett (left) manages to outmaneuver his 
opponents to gain several yards for thie Eagles. 

Steve Camburn (below) accurately times ttie punt 
to disrupt tils opponent's attempt for o successful 
block. 




Tate Nelmark's (above) sack against Nortti Park 
contributed to IBC's 35-7 victory, 

Offensiveman Dave Slinkman (left) plays the de- 
fense wUWe John Karpowicz spots his receiver for a 
ploy against North Park, 



83 



Teammates stand aside as Sherri Petrick takes con- 
trol of the spike (below). 



Setters, 

Spikers, 

And Finalists 



Atrip to thie regional finals and a 42-6 
record constitutes an outstanding 
team in the eyes of the beholder. The IBC 
volleyball team does not only fit these 
qualifications, it also exceeds them with 
individual accomplishments. The team re- 
lied much upon All-American Sherri Pe- 
trick, All-Conference Outside Hitter Vickie 
Miller, and the other individuals named to 
the Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Confer- 
ence squad. These individuals were Miller, 
Patty Mines, Petrick, Patti Russell, and 
Anne Westerkomp, Westerkamp also 
earned all-tournament honors in the 
Colorado College Classic. The record 
achieved by this volleyball team was the 
best in the history of IBC. 

The advancement of IBC's volleyball 
squad to the regional finals was one seen 
in previous years. Unfortunately, the out- 
come was also one seen in past years. For 
the fourth straight year, Elmhurst eliminat- 
ed IBC in the finals, but only after IBC had 
defeated them three times throughout 
the season. 

IBC fans await the 1986 volleyball sea- 
son as they look forward to another out- 
standing team performance which con- 
cludes with on outcome more victorious 
than that of the previous four years. 








1985 Volleyball — Front Row: Patty Mines, Su Larson. 
Row 2: Julie Little, Joyce Watson, Lee Thompson, Pet 
Corcoran, Kim McDonald, Gail Gollo. Row 3: Coach 
Len Forresta, Mary Olson, Sherri Petrick, Vickie Miller, 
Coach Deb DiMatteo. 



84 




Although IBC lost to Elmhurst in the regional tinois. IBC 
defeated them in three of their four meetings during 
the regular season (left). 




1985 Volleyball Record 


IBC 


OPP 


St Xovier 


3 





Elmhurst Kick-Off 


1st 




Corroll 


2 





Malone 


2 





St, Mary's 


2 





Aurora 


2 





Malone 


2 





Elmhurst 


2 


1 


Chicago State 


3 


1 


IBC Invitational 


2nd 




Natl College of Ed. 


2 





Quincy 


2 


1 


John Carroll 


2 





College of St, Francis 


2 





St Xavier 


2 





Marquette 





2 


Wisconsin-Parkside 


2 


3 


Elmhurst 


3 





Judson 


3 





Wise, -Milwaukee Invite 


3rd 




Northeastern Illinois 


3 





U of Purdue-Calumet 


2 


1 


UW-Parkside 





2 


Winona State 


2 





UW-Oshkosh 


2 





Mankato State 


2 


1 


Concordia 


3 





Colorado Col, Classic 


1st 




St, Paul's College 


2 





College of Santa Fe 


2 





Colorado College 


2 


1 


California-Son Diego 


2 





Southern Colorado 


2 





Elmhurst 


2 


1 


Rockford 


3 





Trinity Christian 


3 





Lake Forest Invite 


1st 




Stephens College 


2 





Chicago State 


2 





Aurora 


3 





North Central 


3 





Trinity 


3 





Wheaton 


3 





Elmhurst Invitational 


2nd 




Carroll 


3 





Elmhurst 


1 


3 


UW-Stephens Point 


3 





Juniata 


3 


2 


Northeastern 


3 





DePaul 


1 


3 


Ohio Northern 


3 





Elmhurst 


1 


3 




Although Anne Westerkamp (left) has control of the 
volleyPoll, Vickie Miller is prepared to assist her in 
case back up help is necessary. 



V* 



85 



Motivating 
Spirits 1^ 

The setting is a football game in thie 
midst of the season and the Eagles 
ore losing their fourth game. The fans are 
on the verge of disappointment, Sudden- 
ly their spirits are lifted; not because IBC 
has scored, but because the cheer- 
leaders and pom pon Eaglettes are 
shouting a motivating cheer, 

The cheerleading squad and pom pon 
squad perform during both the football 
and basl<etball seasons. Throughout the 
season, they put forth many hours of 
practice and performed in all sorts of 
weather. They experienced both ups and 
downs during their performances, but al- 
ways concluded the evening with a sure 
sense of satisfaction. 

Both teams are coached by Mary Sar- 
ubbi. The cheerleading captain for the 
season was Carol DeSitter, The co-cap- 
tains of the Eaglettes were Ruth Kubala, 
Alicia Kissane, Maureen Sullivan, and Aline 
Fetter, With this leadership and dedica- 
tion, both teams were able to conclude 
the year with well deserved pride and re- 
spect. 



The pom pon squad (right), which performs during 
halftime, has the opportunity to act as spectators 
during footbail games. 




v' ^J*-." 






>'^-^: 



em:i 





86 



Tina Harper. Nancy Zampa, and Linda Zeck (left) 
cheer on the Eagles' victory over North Park. 



-. ii_Vk_*j^*) 




M 'I ' .^ »'# '^ 



.4 •-■> <>» 







Performing during haiffime at home basketball 
games is a ritual for the pom pon squad (above), 

POMPON SQUAD — FRONT ROW: Ruth Kubala, Mau- 
reen Sullivan, Coach Mary Sarubbi, Alicia Kissane, 
Aline Fetter, ROW 2 Maria Cordon, Tina Mondelli, 
Andrea Dakuras, Holly Hoffman, Terry Brachle. Mary 
Pat Hurley, Jacqueline Coler, Kim Romano, Jenny 
Rock, Sangita Gartonde. ROW 3: Jane Gilligan, Julie 
Nataro, Sue Kong, Liz Ostrowski, Tricia Airan, Shelly 
Langfeld, Nora Crosson, Cindy Hammerstein, Mary 
Svi/anson, Anne Scherbarth, Barbara Opalka, Tracey 
Sheehan, Ginny Olson, 

CHEERLEADING SQUAD — FRONT ROW: Cathy 
Hammes, ROW 2: Tina Harper, Renee Herringer, 
Shawn Mares, Angelica Klabisch, Coach Mary Sar- 
ubbi, ROWS: Nancy Zampa, Linda Zeck, Carol DeSit- 

ter. 




Eaglefte Ginny Olson (above) is pleased with the 
performance of the football team. 



87 



Eagles Just 

Short of This 

Season's 

Goal 

At the start of the 1985-86 Basketball 
season, the IBC Eagles predicted a 
20 win season. Although the team ended 
the season with 18 wins, there was no dis- 
appointment among the coach, players, 
or fans, 

The highlight of the season was the 
grand finale. IBC needed to defeat Auro- 
ra University in the final game to tie for the 
NIIC championship. A win for IBC was ex- 
pected, but the slaughter that took place 
was not. The Eagles defeated Aurora Uni- 
versity with a score of 1 1 1-85 and tied for 
the NIIC championship. The overall season 
record was 18-8 while the conference re- 
cord was 9-1. 

The team was led by Coach Tony LoS- 
cola and the two co-captains, Paul LaS- 
cola and Greg Czerwinski. The team will 
be losing seniors LaScalo, Czerwinski, and 
Roy Nutter to graduation, but the Eagles 
and IBC fans ore optimistic about having 
another successful season and achieving 
the 20 wins desired this year. 

Ray Nu/fee (right) takes advantage of the pregame 
to practice stuffing the basl<etball. 




»,'''<'"^^Hk After o turnover, Barry Bauer (above) beats the Trin- 
ity defense to ttie end of the court to dunk the boll. 







1986 Basketball Record 


IBC 


OPP 


Elmhurst 


70 


55 


Dubuque Tournament 


2nd 




St. Ambrose 


84 


82 


U. of Dubuque 


82 


86 


Lake Forest 


89 


91 


Augustana Tournament 


3rd 




Augustana 


70 


89 


UW — River Falls 


91 


80 


College of St. Francis 


71 


72 


North Park 


77 


78 


Rosary 


110 


82 


Kalamazoo 


86 


65 


St Norbert Tournament 


3rd 




St. Norbert 


72 


87 


UW — Milv^/aukee 


79 


69 


North Central 


76 


85 


Olivet Nazarene 


90 


88 


Trinity 


92 


76 


Concordia 


93 


72 


Judson 


85 


71 


Rockford 


91 


89 


Aurora 


80 


97 


l.l.T. 


99 


77 


Trinity 


97 


56 


Concordia 


104 


78 


Judson 


90 


79 


George Williams 


2 





Rockford 


99 


86 


Aurora 


111 


85 




m 




e^ -r-ms rr—^i s 







^956 BASKETBALL — FRONT ROW Terrence Witler, 
Michael Winans. Donald Weber, John Puetz, Keith 
Bunkenburg, Ray Nutter, Donald Kotecki. ROW 2 
Coach LaScala, Patrick DeCraene, Thomas Hayes, 
Christopher Antonacci, Gregg Czerwinski, Barry 
Bauer, Reginald Season, Paul LaScala, Coach De- 
Broeke, Coach Kilbride. 



89 




A Shot 
At The Title 

Another win against Aurora University 
was ali tt-ie IBC Ladies Basketball 
team needed to obtain the conterence 
titie. On February 25, 1986, the Eagies met 
their match in the game against Aurora. 
At halttime the score was 34-28 with IBC 
leading, but then, during the second half, 
IBC lost their lead and was defeated with 
a score of 79-68. Thus, the IBC Eagles 
landed a second place title in the North- 
ern Illinois Intercollegiate Conference 
(NIIC.) 

Even though the Eagles suffered a loss in 
the final game of the season, they played 
well thourghout the year. They finished 
the 1985-86 season with a 17-8 record. 
For the second year in a row. Senior Co- 
Captain Carol Nadolski was voted the 
Most Valuable Player. The 1986-87 team 
will be at a loss without Nadoiski's leader- 
ship and contribution to the game. With 
the return of most 1985-86 players and 
the participation newcomers, IBC is look- 
ing forward to another successful season 
from the Lady Eagles basketball team. 

1985-86 Ladies Basketball — Front Row: Linda Fox, 
Christine Pease, Janelle Dorsey, Joonn Yerl<es, Sl^ar- 
on MulcatT/, Ctiristine Kavcar, Row 2: Joyce Ryan, 
Kinnberly McDonald, Kattiy Sul<ley, Anne Wester- 
kamp, Carol Nadolski, Kimberly Borgmann. Coach 
David Swanson. 



1985-86 Basketball 


IBC 


OPP 


University of Chicago 


73 


44 


North Park 


66 


60 


George Willianns 


2 





St Norbert 


58 


93 


Marian 


75 


64 


Lake Forest 


63 


50 


UW-Whitev^ater 


47 


83 


Carthage 


70 


68 


Olivet Nazarene 


96 


41 


Trinity 


110 


66 


Concordia 


65 


62 


North Central 


68 


86 


Judson 


69 


59 


r?ockford 


86 


74 


Cornell 


70 


63 


Aurora 


72 


60 


Trinity 


67 


73 


Illinois Wesleyan 


62 


60 


Millikin 


53 


84 


Concordia 


48 


54 


Augustana 


72 


85 


Judson 


89 


34 


North Central 


73 


62 


Rocktord 


57 


54 


Aurora 


69 


79 









90 




I 







Anne Westerkamp (above) races down the court 
after a rebound to help secure IBC's 70-68 victory. 

Guard Kimberly Borgmann (left) searches the court 
for a teammate free of a Carthage player. 



91 



Weekend 
Athletes 

For those students at IBC who consider 
themselves weekend sportsmen, the 
intramural athletic program is the perfect 
program for them. This program offered a 
wide variety of sporting events including 
football, basketball, bowling, and volley- 
ball. Traditionally there has been quite a 
turn-out for each of these sports, making 
intramurals one of the more popular ways 
to spend free time. Coordinated and ran 
primarily by the students, it allows even 
those who are not of professional caliber 
to enjoy their favorite sport from the play- 
ers point of view. 




Intramural volleyball champs (above) pose on a 
bright and sunny day (?) In front of Jaeger, 

Excitement overcomes Jim Furio and Greg Suter 
(right) as they try to scale the fence. 



92 





Tennis anyone'^ Yes, for two students on a sunny 
weekend afternoon (left). 

Softball games are a common site on the field out- 
side Kotilbeck (below). 




A relaxing, friendly game of frisbee breoks up the 
monotony of study (above). 

Blue-collar intramurals such as bowling were just right 
for Paul LaScolo (left). 



93 



The Art 
Of Running 

Dedication and endurance are key 
factors in most sports, especially 
track and cross country. These two teams 
ttirived on these qualities and as a result, 
had successful seasons. 

The cross country team showed out- 
standing individual and team perfor- 
mance. For the twelvth consecutive 
year, the team clinched the Northern Illi- 
nois Intercollegiate Conference (NIIC) ti- 
tle. 

The first four individuals to complete the 
race were IBC runners. John Herlihy fin- 
ished first with a time of 25:47 . He was then 
followed by Dan Domin in 25:51 . Third and 
fourth place finishers, Karl Zuber and Joe 
Kirchner, ran the race in 25:56. All Confer- 
ence Zuber was named Rookie of the 
Year for the Cross Country team. Confer- 
ence champion Herlihy was voted Most 
Valuable Player of the team. He also 
qualified for the national competition 
which was to take place at Emory Col- 
lege. The cross country team completed 
its season with a seventh place finish in the 
NCAA Division III Regionols. 



1985 Cross Country 


IBC 


Teams 


Rockford Invite 


4th 


16 


North Central Invite 


3rd 


9 


Chiicagoland 






Intercollegiate Meet 


6th 


9 


Spartan Invite 


1st 


10 


Illinois 






Intercollegiate 


1st 


7 


Carthage Invite 


8th 


18 


Univ. of Chicago Invite 


4th 


9 


NIIC 


1st 




NCAA Division III 






r?egionals 


7th 


17 



Unless the cross country 1 earn can attend their meet 
in style, they refuse to represent IBC (middle) 

1986 Cross Country — Kneeling: Coach Matt Igoe. 
Standing: Kim Petersen, Joseph Kirchner, Mike Plese, 
John Herlihy. 




94 



The swim team anxiously awaits a fellow teammate wtio will 
tiopefuily break a personal record at the meet (left). 




Relying On 

Individual 

Performance 

/ / T* he emphasis will be on individual 
I goals and improvement," stat- 
ed Head Swim Coach John Martin and the 
beginning of the 1985-86 swimming sea- 
son. This was the case for this year's swim- 
ming team. As a team, IBC's swimmers 
had just fallen short of nationals in the 
Wheaton Invitational. At the end of the 
three day meet. IBC finished in tenth 
place out of the sixteen teams participat- 
ing. Even though the team did not ad- 
vance to the nationals. Freshman Karl 
Zuber was able to compete in this final 
meet on the individual level. Martin's 
statement at the beginning of the season 
had been the reality. As individuals, the 
swimmers achieved their goals and broke 
both IBC and individual records. 

"Honest Coach Martin, I already qudlified for nation- 
als; why do I have to swim another four laps?" 
groans Karl Zuber (left). 



1986 Track and Field — Front Row: Daryl Jones, Daniel Fondern, 
f?ow2: John Herlihy, Susan Riedesel, Cindy Indovina, Kim Petersen 
l?ow 3: Coach Bruce Coleman, Tones Johnson, Randall Pacana, 
Daniel Webb, Brent Yates, Timothy Sebold, Robert Johnson, 
Coach Mark Zych. 



1986 Swimming — Front Row Karl Zuber, Michael Heddins, Coach 
John Martin, Stephen Sowa, Gary Purcell Row 2: Ray Tarkowski, 
Nancy Bos, Paul Beierwaltes. 



95 



Ambition 
At The Net 



/ / r ive racketeers look for first 
r seed," declared the last Can- 
dor issue of the year. The events, howev- 
er leading up to this auspicious headline 
were a combination of triumphs and fail- 
ures and careful improvements. For some, 
like senior Mark Pell, the year started out 
great. Pell was undefeated the first third 
of the season and remained so until the 
April 11th match with the College of St. 
Francis. For others such as Johnny Koo, the 
year showed steady improvement in his 
game, jumping from fourth to second sin- 
gles. With hard work, the fine players on 
the team were able to put themselves in 
great positions by the end of the season. 
Pell was in position for first seed in first sin- 
gles as was Koo at second singles. Pell and 
Koo teamed up for the first seed at first 
doubles. Freshman Young Chon was look- 
ing for a possible first seed in sixth singles, 
but teamed up with junior Ho Sung Pak for 
first seed at third doubles. Lastly, sopho- 
more Vidas Germarko was in position for 
first seed at fourth singles. IBC's tennis 
team concluded its season with an 8-10 
record. With the return of several veter- 
ans and the arrival of new blood, the ten- 
nis team for the 1987 should be a success- 
ful one. 

Wimbleton is the next stop for Johnny Koo after in- 
timidating fiis opponent at tfie net (rigfit). 




96 




t^KtKiit*-—r—'- — r-—.- — i < > ^1. ^ i i — j — * r ->- — ' — * 




Concentrating on the ball, Mark Pell returns his oppo- 
nenfs serve (left ) 

Getting ready to crush a serve is Vidas Germanko 
(belovi/ ) 




1986 Tennis Record 


iBC 


OPP 


North Park 


1 


8 


Triton 


6 


3 


Levi^is 


2 


7 


Moraine Valley 


3 


6 


Chicago State 


8 


1 


St. Francis 





9 


College of DuPage 





9 


North Central 


7 


2 


Elmhurst 





9 


Judson 


8 


1 


IIT 


9 





Concordia 


4 


5 


Rockford 


6 


3 


Aurora University 


7 


2 


University of Chicago 


1 


8 


Trinity 


9 





Wittenberg 





9 


Wooster 





9 


Wright State 


1 


8 


Northeastern 


3 


6 



Doubles partners. Anand Sundaram and Ho Sung 
Pak. enjoy a grueling day out on the courts (left.) 



97 



Pitcher. Laura Timoney. contributed her talent in the 
Eagles 16-16 season record (below). 



A .500 
Season 



Strong hitting and errorless fielding are 
two assets any softball team is hoping 
to obtain. This year the women's softball 
team showed an ample supply of both. 
The season record of 9-4 demonstrates 
their talent. They are still a young team 
that shows great promise for the future. 
With players such as center fielder Anne 
Westerkomp, Peggy Corcoran, Sue Lar- 
son and all the other fine players the team 
has great potential for the coming years. 



1986 Softball Record 


IBC 


OPP 


Eckerd College — 2 


6,4, 


9.5 


St, Leo — 2 


5.6, 


1.2 


Bethune-Cookmon — 2 


2,3 


4.5 


Stetson University 





4 


Manchester 


10 


9 


Chicago State — 2 


11.12 


4.1 


UW-Whitewater — 2 


0.0 


4.6 


Trinity Christian 


2 





Judson — 2 


10.11 


2.6 


Concordia — 2 


12.11 


4.1 


Trinity — 2 


5.26 


4.2 


Rockford — 2 


0.2 


2,3 


Aurora University — 2 


0.0 


3.11 


UW-Whitev^/ater 


2 


7 


Augustona 


3 


4 


UW-River Falls 





5 


Lake Forest — 2 


7,19 


0.4 


Hope 


4 


6 


Alma 


1 


12 


Olivet 


4 


11 


John Carroll 


9 


1 



i^l.» III 






Si 



n 








IH- 



1986 Softball Team — Front Row: Sandy Ledvora. 
Coach Deb DeMatteo. Cindy Hommerstein, Sherri 
Zidek. Bonnie Johnson. Sharon Mulcahy, Row 2 
Joyce Ryan. Gail Gollo. Anna Floss. Jenny Rock, Chris 
Kavcar. Kris DelRose, Row 3: Laura Timoney. Sue Lar- 
son. Debbie Stalnoker. Lisa Corcoran, 



98 




Debbie Stalknaker acts as a powerhouse for the 
team and does not allow any pitcher to psyche her 
out at the plate (above). 

Finding a bat suitable to her, Sandy Ledvora, pre- 
pares to step up to the batting plate, (left) 



1986 Baseball Record 


IBC 


OPP 


West Georgia 


7 


9 


Baldwin Wallace 


11 


10 


Baldwin Walloce 





6 


West Georgia 


10 


15 


U. of Montevallo 


6 


8 


U, of Montevallo 


8 


9 


Georgia Southwestern — 


2 1,6 


2,7 


Georgia Southwestern 


7 


14 


Columbus College 


6 


5 


LoGrange College — 2 


1,8 


7,9 


U. of Montevallo 


6 


13 


Northeastern 


7 


8 


Lewis University 


12 


13 


North Central 


6 


11 


Judson — 2 


13,14 


1,0 


U. of Chicago 


16 


5 


Concordia — 2 


8,13 


4,2 


Elmhurst 


2 


3 


Rockford — 2 


3,8 


2,2 


Aurora — 2 


2,12 


6,15 


Northeastern III, 


14 


8 


U. of Ill-Chicago 


4 


4 


Trinity — 2 


4,4 


2,5 


Lores 


5 


7 


St. Francis 


11 


26 


St. Xavier 





20 


McKendree 


2 


10 


NIIC Playoffs 




2nd 


Rockford 


4 


3 


Aurora University 


3 


4 


U. of Chicago 


6 


2 


North Park 


12 


1 


Chicago State 


7 


10 


Elmhurst 


8 


14 



Being on one's foes is essential, but Pete Nazos 
(right) proves that being off them is equally impor- 
tant. 

Frank Insalaco (below) prepares to do bdttle. 





C^'. 



New Junior Varsity coach. Dove Egofske (below) 
leads a pow-wow out on the mound. '*. 




Kevin Czerak (above) helps the Junior Varsity Eagles 
with his offensive punch. 



100 



^'^" 1 





Eagles 
Slide Into 
2nd in NIIC 



For the baseball team, 1986 was a 
year of frustration. The team exper- 
ienced lapses in defense and, on occa- 
sion, they did not get the tough pitching 
performances they needed. 

The team finished second overall in the 
Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Confer- 
ence (NIIC) behind Aurora University, IBC 
compiled a regular season conference 
record of 7-3, In the NIIC playoffs, the Ea- 
gles were able to win a close game over 
Rockford only to lose to Aurora in the 
championship game. 

Several high points in the Eagles' season 
included a victory over Columbus Col- 
lege, , an NCAA Division II powerhouse, 
and having five teammates voted to the 
NIIC All-Conference team. These five 
baseball players were Sean Brown, Brad 
Cerocke, "Nacho" Perez, Scott Plaehn, 
and Paul "Sammy" Tompulis. The team 
itself voted and gave awards to a few of 
its members for outstanding perfor- 
mances throughout the year, Keith Bun- 
kenburg was voted Most Valuable Player 
of the team. Pete Nazos was named both 
Best Defensive Player and Most Improved 
Player of the team. The Most Valuable 
Rookie award went to Jeff Kendall, And 
finally, Shawn Brown received the Most 
Valuable Pitcher award. The team lost 
only one player to graduation. He was 
rightfielder Pot Nogle, The Eagles look for- 
ward to the return of its veterans and new 
recruits for an enjoyable and successful 
1987 season. 



Keeping his eye on the bail. Nacho Perez is able to 
contribute offensively to IBC's 4-3 victory over r?ock- 
ford. 



101 



EDUCATORS 





During a high school chemistry competi- 
tion, Dr, Wayne Wesolowski (above) 
poses for a picture 

Star Trek at IBC^ Dr James loccino (left) is 
held by two students during a mock re- 
hearsal 

Pointing to an aerial view of the area. Tom 
Dyba (for left) discusses plans for IBC's Sec- 
ond Century, 



103 



JOHN BAWOROWSKY, M.S^ 

Asst. Director of Admissions 
RICHARD BECKER, Ph.D. 

President 
JAMES BELL, Pti.D. 

Dean of Student 

Development 



BARBARA BERNHARD, M Ed. 

Vice President for 

Development Relations 
WALTER BLOCK, M.B.A. 

Vice President Institutional 

Resources 
ART BURTON, M.A. 

Minority Student Coordinator/ 

Recruiter 




MARVIN CAMBURN, Ph.D. 

Dean of Faculty and 

Instruction 
GERALDINE CURLEY, R.N. 

Director of College Health 

Services 
GERALD CZERAK, M.S.J. 

Director of Communications 

and Marketing 



LAURA DAY, B.A. 

Director of Financial Aid 
VIOLET DOLATOWSKI 

Bookstore Manager 
THOMAS DYBA, M.Ed. 

Executive Vice President 




ADMINISTRATION 



104 



Despite all the paperwork cluttering Dr Becker's desk, tie man- 
ages to make time to pose for ttie IBC ptiotograptier (left). 

One of Mr Miyakawa's (below) important tasks for the year was 
arranging the annual phonoromo 




105 



IBC's Director of Health Services, Geraldine Curley (right), is al- 
ways prepared for ailing IBC students. 




Jeffry dark (above) runs around Jaeger Hall searching for para- 
phernalia left behind by IBC residents _- if 



For reiaxment. Professor Charles Meister and Barbara Karchin 
(right) enjoy the company of their colleagues. 




106 




JOHN EBER, Ed.D 

Director of MBA Program 
NORBERT FARAUS, M.Ed. 

Vice President for 

Administration 
JAMES FINNERTY. B.S, 

Admissions Counselor 



JO ANN HAEMMERLE. R.N. 

Student Health) Center 
LOU ANN HAZELTON 

Computer Data Coordinator 
KAY HEATHERINGTON. MA. 

Asst. Dean of Student 

Development 



SR BENITA JASURDA, OSB., MA. 

Convenor. Campus Ministry 
DONALD JUDAY, M.A 

Associate Dean of Continuing 

Education & Director of 

Institute Management 
BARBARA KARCHIN, M.S. 

Director of Career Planning & 

Placement 



I 
J 

r 
I 

I 



PATRICIA KEPOROS, MS, 
Life Planning Counselor & 
Student Activities Director 

BRO. SEBASTIAN KUHN, OSB, 
College Postmaster 

GAY MIYAKAWA, B,A 
Director of Alumni Program & 
Development Services 



ADMINISTRATION 



107 



ALFRED NUNEZ, B,A. 

Admissions Counselor 
JOHN O'KEEFE, M.B.A. 

Director of Computer 

Services, 
WENDY PALESE, B,A, 

Transfer Counselor 



TOM RICH, B,S, 

Director of Admissions 
REV, KEVIN SHEERAN, 0,S,B, 

Vice President for Finance 
KAREN SOLOMON, B,A. 

Admissions Counselor 



LUANN SOMMER, B S 

Director of Cfiild Core Center 
JOANNE STOHS, M.S. 

Hall Director 
DAVID STRIKER, M,S. 

Registrar 



BERT THOMPSON 

Director of Library Services 
REV, STANLEY VESELY, 0,S B., 

Alumni Coordinator 
WALLACE WILLIAMS, M.B.A, 

MBA Program 



M.A. 




ADMINISTRATION 



108 



Dr. Spokas (left) does the tionor of presenting one of the out- 
standing Physics awards at the Physics Club banquet 

Fr Philip (below) tal<es upon the position of chief barbequer at the 
scholars picnic. 




FACULTY 



109 



JOSEPH BOWE, Ph.D. 

Physics 
BARBARA BRIEN, M.FA. 

Fine Arts 
MARY BROOKE, Pti.D, 

Education 



DUANE BUSS, PIn.D. 

Physics 
JOHN BYRNE, PhD, 

Literature & Communications 
THOMAS BYRNES, Ph.D. 

Religious Studies 





Dr. Kittel's door is aiways open to her moth students in need of 
heip (above). 

At the ACS banquet, Dr. Ferroni and Dr. Sonnenberger (right) 
reminisce about their first year on staff at iBC, 



- ijwmpp- 






^ 


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1 


^^^^^^^B 


r 




^ 


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<. — 

i 




V 





110 




ROSE CARNEY, PhD, 
Mathematical Sciences 

EILEEN CLARK, M.S. 
Mathematical Sciences 

ROSEMARY COLEMAN, M,A. 
Literature & Communications 



JAMES CRISSMAN, PhD, 

Sociology 
DAVID DIBBLEE, MBA,, C.P,A, 

Economics & Business 
PATRICIA FAUSER. Ph,D, 

Philosophy 



CHARLES GAHALA, Ed D, 
Economics & Business 

FLORENCE GREBNER, Ph,D, 
Physical Education 

JAMES HAZDRA, Ph,D, 
Chemistry 



PETER HEALY, Ph,D 
Exercise Physiology 

MARY HENESBAUCH 
Music 

RAY HODOR 
Physical Education 



FACULTY 



111 



JOHN HUBENY, J,D., M.BA. 

Economics & Business 
JAMES lACCINO, Ph.D. 

Psycl^oiogy 
REV, ANTHONY JACOB. O.S.B,. M.S. 

Mathematics 



JAMES JANA. MA. 

Sociology 
PHYLLiS KITTLE, Ph.D. 

Mathematical Sciences 
JOHN KLOOS, Ph.D. 

Religious Studies 



REV. MICHAEL KOMECHAK, O SB., MA. 

Fine Arts 
CHRISTOPHER KORNAROS, Ph.D. 

Political Science 
JAMES KREMA, M.S. 

Mathematical Sciences 




t-^J 



dM£Jk 



ANTHONY LaSCALA, M.A. 

Physical Education 
MARK LEE, M.M. 

Music 
SOYON LEE. Ph.D., C.P A. 

Economics & Business 




FACULTY 



112 



ROSALIE LOEDING, MM. 

Music 
JEFFREY MADURA, MBA . C.P.A. 

Economics &. Business 
ALFRED MARTIN, Ph.D. 

Biology 




Members of the Psychology departnnent hold o private luncheon 
to analyze the psychological effects of wine on the human mind. 



113 



RALPH MEEKER, Ph.D. 

Physics 
CHARLES MEISTER. M.B.A, 

Economics & Business 
JOHN MICKUS, Ph.D. 

Biology 



JEANNE NORRIS, Ph.D. 

Exercise Physiology 
JOHN O'BRIEN, Ph.D. 

Literature & Communications 
JOHN OSTROWSKI, M.S., Ed. 

Head Baseball Coach 

Asst. Football Coach 







%. 




■ ^ "^ \ 








Dr. Bell and Kay Heatherlngfon (above) seemed pleased with the 
student activities planned for the 1985-86 school year. 



114 




REV, JOHN PALMER, CSV.. MM. 

Music 
CHARLOTTE PUPPEL, MA. 

Music 
DAVID RAUSCH, Ph.D. 

Chemistry 



MARGARETE ROTH, Ph.D. 

Economics & Business 
MARY ANN SANTUCCI, Ed.D. 

Nursing Education 
GEOFFREY SCHULTZ. Ed.D. 

Education 



PETER SEELY, MA. 

Literature & Communications 
JOEL SETZEN, Ph.D., J.D. 

History 
REV RICHARD SHONKA, O.S.B., M.S. 

Mathematical Sciences 



ALEXEY SHUKIN, Ph.D. 

Counciling Psychology 
NORA SILVIA. R.N. 

Nursing Education 
JOHN SIMS, Ph D. 

Counciling Psychology 



FACULTY 



115 



PETER SORENSEN. Ph.D. 

Management & Organizational 

Betiovior 
JOHN SPOKAS, PhD. 

Physics 
MARK STOHS, Ph.D. 

Philosophy 



JUDI STRAUSS, Ph.D. 

Management &, Organizational 
I Behavior 
REV. THEODORE SUCHY, O.S.B., M.S. 

Biology 
CAROLYN SWALLOW, Ph.D. 

Psychology 



DAVID SWANSON, M.S. 

Physical Education 
JON SWANSON, Ph.D. 

Public Health 
BERNARD TOUSSAINT, Ph.D. 

Philosophy 



REV, PAUL TSI, Ph.D. 

Mathematical Sciences 
GLORIA TYSL, Ph.D. 

History 
GERALD VICTOR, M.B.A., C.P.A. 

Economics & Business 




FACULTY 



116 







REV, MARK WALTZ, O.S.B., M,A, 
Literature & Communications 

WAYNE WESOLOWSKI, PtiD. 
Ctiemistry 

EDWARD WINKLER, Pli.D. 
Chemistry 




From the lack of enttiusicsm on Coocti Mark Zych's face and the 
emptiness of his desk, one can conclude that it is neither the cross 
country nor the track season (above). 

Dr. Bowe (left) does the honor of inducting Rich Anderson into the 
Sigma Phi Sigma Physics Honor Society, 



117 



SENIORS 




Joe Santucci (left), the yearbook photographer, finally 
gets his picture in; in on artistic way. 

Demonstrating tiis guarding abilities. Bob Gerritsen (right) 
guards the bacl< drive for the homecoming football game. 

What is this? A new mod sign post? No, it's Michael Cioffo- 
lietti (above) with his new found sign. 







SENIORS- 



KAREN BALZANTO 

Biology 

CARMELLA BARTUCCI 

Business &, Economics 

LAURA BERNHARD 

Accounting 



DAVID BEYERL 

Cortiputer Science 

CINCI BITZ 

Business & Economics 

JAMES BORSILLI 

Int. Business &, Economics 



CYNTHIA CAHILL 

Mathematics 

ELISE CARBINE 

Accounting 

MICHAEL CIOFFOLETTI 

Int. Business & Economics 



ROBERT CLARK 

Business & Economics 

THOMAS COLE 

Physical Education 

MARY COLER 

Psychology 




120 



Michelle Rodzak and Patty Perrone (left) point out thie way to 
thieir tiome for the year. 



RUN WITH THE WOLF! 




Greg Czerwinski (doosie) gets a brainstorming idea as to how he 
should waste away his weekend 

Distrubed Gerry Majerczyk (left) does not like being interrupted 
while he attempts to keep up with world news. 



121 



Paul LaScala (right) seems pleased with his performance as he 
tells Kerry Sugrue about the basketball game, 

Ginny Olsen and William McGuire (below) dress up in their original 
costumes before 'trick or treating' in Neuzil Hail. 




Edwin Sena (above) takes advantage of the opportunity to be 
photographed with four senior ladies — Laura Bernhard, Sandy 
Kozubowski, Carmello Bartucci, and Jill Vest. 



122 



SENIORS 




CARYN COLLINS 

Nuclear Medicine 

DIANE CONNOLLY 

Int. Business & Economics 

MARIA CORDON 

Psychology 



CHRIS CORNILLE 
Biochemistry 
NORA CROSSON 
Elementary Education 
LAURA CUSACK 
Business & Economics 



GREG CZERWINSKI 

Mathematics 

CORRINE DANHAUER 

Nutrition 

DEBRA DOLANSKY 

Int Business & Economics 



PATRICIA DONNELLY 

Psychology 

JANELLE DORSEY 

Biology 

PETER DRAGISIC 

Biology 



123 



SENIORS- 



ROSANNE DRESSEL 

Business & Economics 

ELIZABETH DVORAK 

Psychology 

KATHLEEN FARRELL 

Elementary Education 



FRANCINE GADZALA 

Int. Business & Economics 

Political Science 

VIRGINIA GARDNER 

Business &, Economics 

CAROLYN GAWRYSH 

Bioctiemistry 



AMY GEDRITIS 

Elementary Education 

ROBERT GERRITSEN 

Political Science 

. MARIA GHANAYEM 

Accounting 



WILLIAM GIAMBRONE 

Political Science 

LAURA GIANCOLA 

Biology 

JAMES GLIMCO 

Accounting 




124 



Karen Balzanto (below) is up to her knees with IBC gorbage 



": '^M:'^^'^ 




Jackie Daily and Edwin Sena (above) — two members of the 
Neuzil Holl superboli team 

Don Sciackifano (left) kindly threatens the photographer that this 
picture of him in the library had better not destroy his image. 



125 




Enjoying the relaxed life of a senior, Carolyn Lombardi (above) takes a break 
from the routine by having a cool drink and talking on the phone. 

Not a typical senior, Tom LeCompte (right) has gone to IBC part time over the 
course of five years and yet still participates in the pep band. 



126 




SENIORS 




MARY GORMAN 

Literature & Communications 

CYNTHIA GORSKI 

Cliemistry 

MARIANNE HEDIN 

Int. Business & Economics 



THOMAS HUFFMAN 
Business & Economics 
MARY PAT HURLEY 
Business & Economics 
CYNTHIA INDOVINA 
Nutrition 



JOAN JEHLIK 
Political Science 
EDWARD JURKOVIC 
Biology 

JOSEPH KAENEL 
History 



DANIEL KEATING 

PhilosopLiy 

MARY CLARE KEBLUSEK 

Int. Business & Economics 

JUDITH ANN KELLER 

Int. Business & Economics 



127 



SENIORS- 



JOSEPH KIRCHNER 

Accounting 

JANE KLAMERUS 

Psychology 

DONNA KLIVER 

Mathematics 



JOHN KOZAL 

Biology 

SANDRA KOZUBOWSKI 

Accounting 

RUTH KUBALA 

Literature & Communications 



NICHOLAS KUGIA 

Biology 

SANDRA LEDVORA 

Mathematics 

KATHARINE LILLIG 

Literature & Communications 



VICTOR LITWIN 

Business & Economics 

CAROLYN LOMBARDI 

Business & Economics 

THOMAS MANGIARACINA 

Computer Science 




128 




Francine Gaozala (left), voted best dressed in ttie Senior class, 
breaks away from her reputation once a month to tit in with IBC's 
dress code. 




Bill Giambrone (above) is working at fulfilling his senior award as 
the one most likely to become a millionaire. 

Receiving flowers from strange men is a routine activity for Cindy 
Gorski (left). 



129 



studying is Fun! Maria Cordon (right) gives 
o big smile wliile reading physiology 

Tlie ACS banquet was celebration time for 
seniors like Ramona Kragman and Carolyn 
Gawrysh (below). 




Senior Football Captain Steve Camburn (right) leads the fighting Eagles onto the 
field for the homecoming "Glory Days" against North Park. 



- SENIORS 




WILLIAM McGUIRE 
Political Science 

MIKE McKENNA 
Accounting 

ROBERT MERTZ 
Business & Economics 



MARK MIKLOSZ 

Business & Economics 
VICKIE MILLER 

Business & Economics 
TERESA MIOTKE 

Biology 



PHILIP MOORE 

Biology 
WILLIAM MORAN 

Biology 
VINCE MOSQUERA 

Masters of Business 

Administration 



PATRICK MULCAHY 
Religious Studies 

CAROL NADOLSKI 
Ptiysical Education 

JOHN NELLIS 
Politlcol Science 



131 



SENIORS - 



TODD NELMARK 

Biology 

CONNIE NICKELS 

Int. Business & Economics 

VINCENT NOTARIANO 

Business & Economics 



JULIE O'CONNOR 

Psychology 

MARY OLSON 

Literature & Communications 

STEPHEN PALATINUS 

Biology 



MAYUR PATEL 

Biochemistry 

MARK PELL 

Business &, Economics 

PATRICK PERICHT 

Business & Economics 



PATTY PERONE 

Business & Economics 

PEGGY PERONE 

Psychology 

TED POPIELEWSKI 

Business & Economics 




132 




While setting tier tiair for the events of tfie nigfit, Laura Cusack 
(left) demonstrates ttie proper way to ctiew tobacco 



. V< 




-iw 




After rolling in ttie mud. Jeremy Dobrowolski (obove) demands a 
tougti cleaning bleach to whiten his clothes as well as his body, 

"Wtio says 7up tias no caffeine''" asks Laura Bernhard, (left). 



133 



Procopian of the Year Marianne Hedin (right) has some fun with 
the yearbook photographer. 

Seniors gather to talk and drinl< for the last time at IBC during the 
senior picnic on moving out day (below). 




Demonstrating some of his winning moves is Mark Pell (right), who 
led the IBC Tennis team. 



134 



■SENIORS 




MICHAEL RILEY 

Physical Education 

ALBERT RODRIGUEZ 

Biology 

MICHELE RODZAK 

Accounting 



FRANK RUFF 
Business & Economics 
DINO RUMURO 
Biochemistry 
PATRICIA RUSSELL 
Computer Science 



JOYCE RYAN 

Accounting 

JOSEPH SANTUCCI 

Sociology 

EDWARD SCHMELZER 

Sociology 



DONALD SCIACKITANO 
Literature & Communications 
EDWIN SENA 
Accounting 
DANIEL SKAWINSKI 
Computer Science 



135 



SENIORS- 



DAVID SOFIA 

Business &, Economics 

KAREN SOLOY 

Accounting 

DANIEL SOMMERS 

Accounting 



DON ST GERMANE 

Int. Business & Economics 

JOSEPH STOCCHERO 

Business & Economics 

THOMAS STOLE 

Business & Economics 



PHILIPPE STREICHER 

Int. Business & Economics 

MAUREEN STUEVER 

Biochiemistry 

KERRY SUGRUE 

Accounting 



GREG SUTER 

Business Economics 

MARY SVEC 

Business &, Economics 

RAYMOND TARKOWSKI 

Accounting 




136 



^^^ T ISSKS 



Jocile Walsh (left), unlike most IBC students, seems perfectly flop- 
py doing stotistic problems. 





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Cathy Hammes (above) allows Ginny Olsen to discover tier talent 
of cutting flair. 

James Kutiiek (left) is intrigued witfi the art of squeezing on or- 
ange for orange crusfi. 



137 



Cramming for an exam just does not agree with Laura Bernhard 
(below), especially when there is something better to do. 




Bob Gerhtsen (above) realizes he is allergic to flowers, but only 
after he gives a nosegay to Cindy Gorski. 

In an attempt to defend Laura Giancola's honor, Don Sciakitano 
(right) explains the rules of the shoot out to Ed Schmeizer, 



-SENIORS 




LAURA TIMONEY 
Business & Economics 
JOHN TUCKEI? 
Computer Science 
JUDITH TUDISCO 
Nuclear Medicine 



JILL VEST 

Accounting 

VIKKI VLASTNIK 

Chiemistry 

MARY ROSE VOKURKA 

Health Science 



JOCILE WALSH 
Health Science 
NANCY WEDHOFF 
Nuclear Medicine 
WILLIAM WILDER 
Music 



LINDA ZEC 

Business & Economics 
VINCENT ZUPPA 
Business & Economics 



139 




Romance was in the air at Senior Bali for Diane 
Mikoiecky and Jeff McShane (far above). 

Wearing a pantsuit, Trisfi Keporos (above) sl^ows 
her ow/n style at the Bali. 

Greg Suter (right) picks up a iittle something to 
drink before the bail 



140 




Having A Ball 

On a magic, mystical evening every No- 
vember, all the IBC seniors celebrate 
Senior Boll. Thiis years gala event took place at 
Allguers at ttie Lisle Hilton. Girls spent months 
looking for just the right dress. Guys waited pa- 
tiently for the girls selection so the tie and cum- 
berbund v\/ith the tuxedo would match. Classes 
were unimportant on that Friday afternoon. 
There were many parties in Neuzil before ever 
making it to the Hilton. The evening at the hotel 
started with cocktails, which were followed by 
dinner. The prime rib satisfied everyone's appe- 
tite. Dancing was next on the agenda. While all 
this was going on, a professional photographer 
captured the evening on film for memories. 
Afterwards, parties continued into the wee 
hours of the morning. Some stayed at the Hilton 
in rooms, others came back to campus. Every- 
one had on enjoyable and very memorable 
evening. 

Another happy couple at the ball are Holly Perkins and Bill 
Smith (above left). 

Keeping in style by matching the tux with the dress are Don 
Sclakitono and Laura Giancola (right). 

Laughing it up while dancing at the ball are Ed win Sena and 
Liz Ostrowski (below) 




141 



Roasting 
The End 



Senior Roast! What does it mean? It means 
two tilings: announcement of the senior 
superlatives and the last pub party for the 
graduating class. In memory of four years here, 
sliders and submarines were served, and, of 
course, the beer flowed freely, Superlatives 
brought back memories, as most seniors re- 
ceived a title chosen by their peers. Some peo- 
ple were a shoe-in for some award, and others 
took all by surprise. The music brought bock 
memories. Current hits, popular songs from the 
last four years and IBC favorites hod everyone 
on the dance floor for the night. Friends chat- 
ted about both the post and future, Although it 
was a celebration, there were sad feelings too, 
since it was a party to signify the leaving of IBC 
and moving on to bigger and better things. 
Everyone had a great time roasting the end of 
an era. 

With his dancing, Dan Sommers (right) tells us how much he 
likes IBC, 

YMCAi Brings back memories as seniors celebrate the su- 
perlatives at the roast (below). 





Greg Suter. Paul Anderson and Mary Claire Keblusek (left) 
are all definitely "into" something. 

Dancing up a storm at tier last IBC Pub Party is Senior Maria 
Cordon (below). 




Taking a break from the fun are Connie Nickels. Mary Rose 
Vokurka. Jill Vest and Carolyn Gawrysh (above), 

'loo/< Mom,' ,'/Vo/ionds,','" exclaims Michael Cioffoletti (left). 
May 1986, Senior Roast, 



143 



Abbot Hughes did the honor of handing out the diplomas to the proud 
graduates (below.) 



G-Day 



One day in May — May 24th to be exact, 
the sun shined and a light breeze rustled 
through the campus of IBC. On such a perfect 
day what else could IBC do but hold the ninety- 
third Commencement Convocation that day. 
The day began early with people busily setting 
up the chairs and the stage. By 1 1 : 15 the last of 
the ACS (American Chemical Society) mem- 
bers showed up to help set up and get their 
assignments for seating the guests. Soon after- 
wards the excited parents and other relatives 
of the soon-to-be graduates started to trickle 
in. One o'clock, the fateful moment, hod finally 
arrived, and the candidates began their long 
procession ffrom the Scholl Science Center to 
the Dan and Ada Rice Center. The assembled 
members listened carefully to the invocation 
given by Rt. Rev. Hugh R. Anderson, O.S.B., 
which was followed by the Student Address 
delivered by Donald F. Sciackitano and finally 
the Commencement address eloquently stat- 
ed by Edward H. Schmit, Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees. The graduation candidates eager- 
ly proceeded to receive their degree. Among 
the happy graduates were none other than 
this year's Yearbook editor, Vikki Vlastnik and 
yearbook staffer, Cindy Gorski. Congratula- 
tions to this year's graduates and Best Wishes. 





The calm before the storm. The Rice Center awaits the stampede of 
parents, relatives, friends and graduates (above.) 



144 



Two three-year roomafes, Vikki Vlastnik and Cindy Gorski, share 

the some successful feeling as nnany IBC graduates, but they also 

realize that now these are memories and It Is time to go their Reminiscing about ttie past four years, Don Sciackitano delivers 

seporate ways (below.) the Student Address to the Class of '86 (below.) 




Frestiman Nancy Ghanayem Is so enthused about her sister Mar- 
la's graduation that she can not wait to receive a diploma of her 
own (above.) 



146 



Baccalaureate Mass was an emotional after- 
noon for seniors like Mary Coler (rigtit). 

Accompanied by Miclielle Dixon, Mary Gornnan 
(below) sings otter the slide show. 







Delivering a prayer during Baccalaureate Mass is 
Ed Schmelzer (above). 

Seniors (right) hold candles during moss while lis- 
tening to Abbott Hugh. 




A Final Mass 



While sitting at Baccalaureate Mass, sen- 
iors really begin to realize that they are 
leaving IBC. Father Ralph's homily gave every- 
one something to remember and think about, 
He touched upon something that everyone 
could relate to and that could have possibly 
happened in four years at IBC. Parents, faculty 
and students all shared this special afternoon 
of May 9, 1986. The slide show for students 
afterwards brought back vivid memories of the 
four years spent here. Mary Gorman sang one 
last song for the senior class. Tears could be 
seen on some faces. Everyone was emotional- 
ly moved. The reception afterwards was much 
lighter and cheerier. Faculty and students min- 
gled, chatted and laughed about the last four 
years. It was the start of the end of four years at 
IBC. 

Helping line the seniors up and passing out candles before 
the mass are Tom Huffman and Don Sciokitono (left) 

In an aerial view of the Social Center, Abbott Hugh (below) 
blesses the wine to be offered during the mass 



I 

I 

i 

r 
I 




?f'f-lK 







Seniors: 
Do You Remember? 






■'^Si^ 



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V..- 



£. 




f^' 





149 



Class of 1986 (right) poses for a group shot at the jf' 
senior picnic. 

Barbecuing are Liz Dvorak, Sandy Ledvoro, Patty 
Russell, Caryn Collins, and Joyce Ryan (below). 

"Hey! Leave my stomach alone!" As seniors (far 
below) maul each other. 








y- 




\ 



4 



I ■■ » ! 






I 



Beer, Balls 
And Burgers 

A sunny Sunday, May 4, 1986 and there 
were few seniors on campus. Buses had 
taken them to the Senior Picnic at Bemos 
Woods in Western Springs. The Senior Class 
Board planned the festive afternoon. Activities 
included softball, frisbee and, of course, beer 
drinking. Seniors worked on their tans, every- 
one ate burgers and celebrated the end of 
four years. It was the continuation of the re- 
membering of four years at IBC. Seniors cele- 
brated throughout the last two weeks of 
classes. Private picnics outside of Neuzil were 
also a common sight. Seniors celebrated in any 
way possible during the last few weeks at IBC, 
and this picnic off campus provided a perfect 
reason to kick back, hove a good time and let 
the beer flow! 

"Hi Mom'" from Cindi Bitz. Mary Pat Hurley, Nora Crosson 
and Carolyn Lombordi (above left). 

Batting is Mary Coler (below left) as Laura Cusack watcties 
from on on-deck area. 

Unaware at ttie ptiotographer, Jim Furio (below) gets back 
to nature 




151 



Moving Day 

Friday May 16, 1986 was moving day for the 
IBC campus. The first sign of this event w/as 
the appearance of the dumpsters. 

If you wanted to pick-up some cheap furni- 
ture, this was the place to go. It was also the 
day that all the missing lounge furniture magi- 
cally reappeared, and SAGA finally got their 
plates and silverware. For most people, it was a 
time to help a few friends carry their stuff down 
all those stairs and to say 'see ya next year,' 
but not for the seniors. It was the end of four 
great years at IBC. This day was to celebrate 
the end of classes, papers, tests or finals for 
them with the senior picnic. They were able to 
share past memories and plans for the future. 
This was to be the very last celebration togeth- 
er as an IBC student. The next time they would 
meet would be to receive their diplomas and 
invite one another to graduation parties. 

With the aid of paper bags and a trunk. Potty Donnelly 
(right) is ready to move out for the final time, 

Neuzil residents (below) take a "'break" from the strains of 
moving, i.e. they find another reason to party 





^r^^ .; 



The Neuzil dumpster ond its contents (left), a favorite hong 
out spot on moving day 

Peggy Perrone, Dawn Hinz, John Kozal, Patty Perrone, and 
Paul Tompulis (below left) pose one last tinne. 

Francine Gadzala (below) shows that she's got beauty as 
well as brains. 




Sandy Ledova. Joyce Ryan, Patricia Russell and Liz Dvorak 
(above) show they are friends to the end 

Kerry Sugrue and Paul LaScala (left) share a tender mo- 
ment in the midst of the havoc of moving 



153 



INDEX 



Abramson, John 109 
Abrams. Thomas 19 
Adrian, Debbie 109 
Agnoii, Robert 25. 43, 71 
Airan, Lisa 6, 15, 27, 50, 57, 61 
Airan, Patricia 3, 25, 87 
Altepeter, Stacy 33, 64 
Alvarez, Luz 68, 109 
Anderson, David 23 
Anderson, Paul 29, 141 
Anderson, Richard 18, 21, 74 
Anderson, Timothy 16 
Andrews, Keith 4 
Antonacci, Christopher 21, 89 
Averett, Trevor 82, 83 
Booske, Jill 60 
Bajda, Edward 16 
Baker-Watson, J, Brian 21, 82 
Baker, James 109 
Ballard, Julie 72 



Bolzanto, Karen 120, 125 

Barber, Lorry 23, 82 

Barker, Gerald 82 

Barnes, Chris 58 

Bortoszer, Annette 64 

Bartucci, Carmela 13, 67, 69, 120 

Borz, Bill 82 

Batts, Cheryl 72 

Bauer, Barry 88, 89 

Baworowsky, John 104 

Been, Philip 109 

Season, Reginald 89 

Beaudin, Kevin 19 

Becker, Richard 37, 104, 105 

Becker, Vincent 3, 19, 36, 50, 51, 52, 64, 

65 
Bedore, Gerald 27 
Beierwoltes, Paul 21, 95 
Bell, Maurice 29 
Bell, James 55, 104, 114 





Belushi, Jim 58, 59 

Benesh, Anne 33 

Beran, Douglas 19, 63, 75 

Berkes, Sheila 72 

Bernhard, Laura 27, 55, 120, 133, 138 

Bernhard, Barbara 104 

Besharo, Tom 82 

Beyerl, David 120 

Billings, Mary 33 

Billings, William 21 

Birck, Christopher 21 

Bitz, Cindi 120, 151 

Black, Joan 109 

Blockwell, Kelly 33 

Blasz, Scott 3, 23, 82 

Block, Theresa 2, 26, 29, 50 

Block, Walter 104 

Bodner, George 75 

Borgmann, Kimberly 90, 91 

Borsilli, James 120 

Bos, Nancy 12, 95 

Bowe, Joseph 76, 110, 117 

Brachle, Nancy 31 

Brachle, Teresa 32, 33, 87 

Brady, John 82 

Brien, Barbara 110 

Brieske, Brian 19, 39, 53 

Britz, Amy 33 

Brooke, Mary 110 

Brown, Shawn 25 

Brozovich, Joanne 68, 70, 72 



154 



Brzeczek, Michael 82 

Bunkenburg, Keith 89 

Burandt, Scott 82 

Burton, Art 104 

Buss, Duone 110 

Byrnes. Thomas 1 10 

Byrne, John 110 

Byrne, Martin 18, 19, 21, 82 

Cahill, Cynthia 120 

Cadman, Mike 9, 82 

Calzaretta, Christine 31 

Camburn. Stephen 8, 19, 21, 37, 82, 83, 

130 
Camburn, Marvin 104 
Cappetto, Natalie 31 
Capps, Christopher 82 
Carbine, Elise 29, 120 
Carmody, John 21 



Carney, Rose 1 1 1 

Castillo, Marquita 31 

Cotes, Barry 21, 82 

Cepeda, Ramon 21 

Cerocke, Brad 46 

Ching, Robert 25, 68, 70 

Chon, Yong 25, 70, 71 

Chua, Christopher 21 

Cioffoletti, Michael 27, 67, 69, 72, 119, 

120, 141 
Clark. Eileen 111 
Clark, James 4, 19, 106 
Clark, Lawrence 29 
Clark, Robert 11, 120 
Clescen, Josilyn 31 
Colandrea, Barbara 27 
Cole, Thomas 82, 120 
Coleman, Bruce 95 




I 



155 



INDEX 



Coler, Jacqueline 31, 47, 67, 87 

Coleman, Rosemary 1 1 1 

Color, Joseph 31 

Coler, Mary 120, 146, 151 

Collins. Caryn 27, 123, 150 

Connolly, Diane 33, 67, 72, 123 

Cooney, John 25 

Corcoran, Margaret 84, 88 

Cordon, Maria 27, 87, 123, 130, 143 

Cornille, Christopher 23, 123 

Coscino, Joseph 42, 43, 70 

Crissman, James 1 1 1 

Cross, Sherri 33, 72 

Crosson, Nora 7, 24, 29, 87, 123, 151 

Curley, Geraldine 104, 106 

Cusack, Laura 27, 123, 133, 151 

Cyranek Jr Leonard 23, 82 

Czerak, Gerald 104 

Czerak, Kevin 21, 68, 100 

Czerwinski, Gregg 6, 27, 63, 89, 121, 123 

Czech, John 21 

Dado, Gina 33, 68 

Daily, Jackie 27, 125 

Dakuras, Andrea 33, 87 

Daley, Martin 9, 82 





Dalton, Debbie 31 

Daly, Korin 42 

Danhauer, Corlnne 29, 55, 123 

Davidson. Steven 19. 21. 80 

Davis. Dwight 23 

Davy. Timothy 82 

Day, Laura 104 

Debroeke. Sam 89 

Debarr. Timothy 23 

Decraene. Patrick 21. 64. 89 

Degregorio. Michael 19 

Dela Cruz. Marilu 68. 70. 72 

Delrose. Kristine 25. 98 

Deltoral. Roger 12 

Deol. Baljit 70. 80. 81 

Desitter. Carol 87 

Dhutia. Manish 80 

Dhutia. Sanjay 70. 80 

Dibblee. David 111 

Dimotteo. Deb 84. 98 

Dipietro. Diane 27. 73 

Dix. Gerald 12 

Dixon. Michelle 25. 146 

Dobrowolski. Jeremy 10. 29. 80. 133 

Dolan. Timothy 23 

Dolansky. Debra 72. 133 

Dolatowski. Violet 104 

Dominiak, David 82 

Donnelly, Patricio 27, 123, 152 

Dorigan, Patrick 6 

Dorsey, Janelle 33, 90, 91, 123 

Drogisic, Peter 123 

Dressel, Rosanne 29, 124 

Dudek, Robert 21 



156 



Dvorak, Elizabeth 27. 124, 
Dyba, Thomas 102, 104 
Egofske, Dave 82, 101 
Egofske, John 23 
Ejmo, Marilyn 31 
Erdman, Janet 33 
Evteneuer, Michael 23 
Evanish, James 47 



153 



Farnus, Norb 106 
Parrel!, Kathleen 29, 66, 124 
Parrel!, Patricio 25 
Fauser, Patricio 1 1 1 
Ferroni, Ed 76, 110 
Fetter, Aline 87 
Finnerty, James 107 
Floss, Anno 98 





Foley, Patricia 33 

Fondern, Daniel 29, 95 

Forresto, Len 84 

Fortuna, Michael 72 

Fox, Lynda 33, 90 

Priol, Maria 69, 72 

Prieders, Dione 73 

Furio, Gina 30, 57 

Furio, James 14, 17, 27, 60, 92, 151 

Fuys, Michael 23, 25, 37 

Gobert, Jean 73 

Godzala, Francme 4, 75. 124, 129, 153 

Gaitonde, Songita 31, 47, 87 

Gahalo, Charles 1 11 

Gallagher, Michael 23, 82 

Gallo, Gayle 31, 52, 98 

Gannon, Edward 84 

Gardner, Virginia 29, 124 

Garrett, Joseph 19 

Garrell, Gigi 33 

Gawrysh, Carolyn 29. 60. 77, 124, 130, 143 

Geddis, Trovis 23, 79, 82 

Gedritis, Adam 23 

Gedritis, Amy 124 

Germanko, Vince 96 

Gerritsen, Robert 6, 27, 63, 119, 124, 138 

Ghanayem, Maria 36, 124, 145 

Ghanayem, Nancy 36, 145 

Giombrone, Williom 124, 129 



I 

■ 

I 
I 

P 
I 



157 



INDEX 



Giancola. Laura 33, 55, 124, 141 
Gilligan, Jane 25, 40, 87 
Glennon, Jeanne 31 



Glimco, James 8, 27, 67, 69, 124 
Golden, John 82 
Goodwin, Turner 23, 33 





Gorman, Hugh 21 

Gorman, Mary 27, 28, 55, 127, 146 

Gorski, Cynthia 6, 27, 61, 127, 129, 138, 

145 
Grcmly, Todd 25 
Grebner, Florence 1 1 1 
Grennan, Carlo 29 
Griffing, Christopher 27 
Griswold, Timothy 21 
Grodesky, Vicki 33 
Guinta, Cara 25 
Gutierrez, Eloy 23 
Gutt, James 25 
Hoddad, Ahob 23 
Hoddad, William 23 
Hoetlinger, Jocqueline 33 
Haemmerle, JoAnn 107 
Hall, Timothy 82 
Homel, Richard 72 
Hommerstein, Cindy 3, 87, 98 
Hommes, Catherine 17, 33, 87, 137 
Hansen, Michael 23, 82 
Harper, Tina 33, 68, 86, 87 
Hart, Julie 31 



158 



Hazdra, James 111 

Hartwig, F. Robert 21 

Hazelton, LouAnn 107 

Hayes. Thomas 89 

Heoley, Kathleen 47 

Heddins, Michael 95 

Hedin, Marianne 55, 67. 70, 74, 127, 134 

Healy, Peter 111 

Henesbough, Mary 1 1 1 

Herlihy, John 27, 94, 95 

Hetherington, Kay 31, 41, 107. 114 

Herringer, Renee 25, 87 

Heywood, Patricia 33 

Hinz, Dawn 29, 57, 153 

Hnilicko, Jeanne 15, 33, 55 

Hodor, Ray 1 11 

Hoffman, Andrew 82 

Hoffman, Holly 87 

Hogan, Mary 12 

Hollenbeck, Paul 23 

Holley, Rodell 64, 65 

Horton, John 3, 23, 25, 37, 43, 66 

Hourican, Laura 23 

Hubeny, John 112 

Huffman, Thomas 82. 127. 147 

Hugh, Abbott 145, 147 

Hughes, Susan 8 

Hunt, Catherine 29 

Hurley, Mary 24, 87. 127. 151 




I 






1 


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B 


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1 


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1 


^^^^^^^^^^llUW 


.■*s 






N^9^»S^ ■'^ 


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laccino. James 103, 112 
Ilic, Werner 23, 82 
Igoe, Matt 94 

Indovina, Cynthia 27, 95, 127 
Insaloco, Frank 100 
Izzo, Allan 71 
Jacob. Anthony 1 12 
Jagodzinski. Richard 23 
Jakubowskl. Gary 27 
Jono. James 1 12 
Jankowski, Jeffrey 60 
Janowiak, Edward 23, 43 
Jasurda, Benito 107 
Jaseckos, Ernest 25 
Jehlik, Joan 127 
Jendro, Glenn 27 
Jirka, Meredith 72, 73, 76 
Johnson, Bonny 98 
Johnson, Donald 82 
Johnson, Edward 19 
Johnson, Robert 29, 95 
Johnson, Theresha 33 
Johnson, Tonas 82, 95 
Jones, Daryl 27, 95 
Jones, Stephanie 33 
Judoy, Donald 107 
Juday, Holly 31, 50, 64, 67 
Jurkovic, Edward 29, 70, 127 
Kaenel, Joseph 127 



I 
I 

I 
I 

i 

I 



159 



INDEX 





Karchin, Barbara 106, 107 


Khan, Iqbal 17, 27,68, 70 


Kobal, Karen 33 




Karpowicz, John 82, 83 


Khun, Sebastian 107 


Koehler, Brett 21, 82 




Kastys, Linas 82 


Kilbride, Coach 89 


Kolich, Kenneth 23 




Kavanaugh, Kevin 19 


Kim, Tong 23, 76 


Komechak, Michael 112 




Kovanaugh, Michael 98 


King, Patrick 23 


Kong, Susan 87 




Kavcar, Christine 90 


Kirchner, Joseph 27, 94, 128 


Kontogeorgis, Niki 33, 64 




Kaye, Morybeth 31 


Kirwan, Gregory 23, 39 


Koo, Johnny 19, 70, 71, 96 




Keating, Daniel 23, 127 


Kissane, Alicia 6, 8, 87 


Kopulos, Beth 3, 42, 55, 71 




Keblusek, Mary 127, 143 


Klabisch, Angelica 33, 87 


Kornaros, Aristotle 21, 64, 65, 68, 70 




Keller. Judith 127 


Klamerus, Jane 128 


Kornaros, Christopher 112 




Kemp, Daniel 19, 55, 65 


Klimek, Mark 19, 80 


Kosobucki, Jeffrey 73 




Keporos, Patricia 107, 140 


Kliver, Donna 128 


Kotecki, Donald 21, 89 




Kerivan, Vincent 23 


Kloos, John 112 


Kowalski, Mark 23 




Ketchum, James 25 


Knepler, Michael 10, 81, 21 


Kozal, John 29, 52, 128, 153 




160 



Kozal, Paul 27 

Kozubowski, Kenneth 27 

Kozubowski. Sandra 31, 33, 56, 72, 128 

Krema, James 1 12 

Kristopaitis, Theresa 31, 50 

Krogman, Romono 130 

Krupp, Robert 42 

Kubala, Alice 27 

Kubala, Ruth 27, 87, 128 

Kubek, Lynette 8, 25 

Kugia, Nicholas 27, 128 

Kutiiek, James 25, 53, 64, 65, 137 

Lalonde, Lawrence 29, 78, 80 

Lamorgo, Carolyn 30, 31, 53 

Langfeld, Michelle 87 

Laporta, Joseph 23, 39 

Larson, Susan 84, 98 

Lascala, Anthony 89, 112 

Lascala, Paul 8, 27, 89, 93, 122, 153 

Laurich, Mark 82 

Lecompte, Thomas 126 

Ledvora, Sandra 27, 98, 128, 150, 153 

Lee, Mark 112 

Lee, Soyon 112 

Leighty, Kevin 82 

Leick, Karen 31 

Lemonnier, Mark 27, 66 

Lesch, Mark 82 

Lesch, Michael 82 

Leske, Mary 27 

Lesperance, Christopher 27 

Leurck, Anne 17 

Letourneau, Michael 18, 21 

Lewis, David 21, 82 

Lillig, Katharine 33, 128 

Lind, Kevin 82 

Link, Julia 25 

Little, Julie 84 

Litwin, Victor 25 

Lobello, Christopher 21, 64 

Loeding, Rosalie 113 

Lombardi, Carolyn 27, 126, 128, 151 

Loritz, Ralph 27 

Lugo, Ricardo 27, 68, 69, 70 

Lutorewych, Kotherine 31 

Lynch, Patrick 21, 82 

Madura, Jeftrey 113 

Mojerczyk, Gerard 25, 43, 74, 121 

Malotestinic, Paul 21 

Mongioracina, Thomas 128 

Monlik, Andrea 33 

Manning, Jeanne 8, 10, 29, 66 

Mares, Shawn 46, 87 

Money, Joseph 27, 82 

Morquordt, Elizabeth 33 

Martin, Alfred 113 

Martin, John 95, 113 

Martin, Steven 73 

Maschek, Mary 31 

Mayo, Eric 21 




161 



INDEX 




McAuliffe, Kathleen 33 
McDonald, Kimberly 53. 84, 90 
McGee, Grovena 33 
McGrail, Martin 82 
McGuire, William 27, 29, 122, 131 



McHugh, Margaret 113 
McKeehan, David 36, 80 
McKendry, Jeffrey 82 
McKenna, Michael 82, 131 
McMahon, Edward 19, 82 



McShane, Jeffrey 25, 140 
Meehon, James 73, 113 
Mealy, Kathleen 31 
Meinhart, Thomas 23, 82 
Meister, Charles 106, 114 
Melei, Mary 33, 69 
Melinauskas, Steven 23, 25 
Menoloscino, Anthony 69 
Menolasino, Michael 29, 51, 80 
Mertz, Robert 21 
Mickus, John 114 
Miklosz, Mark 15, 27, 55, 131 
Mikulecky, Diane 10, 27, 29, 140 
Miller, Vickie 29, 84, 85, 131 
Mines, Patricia 84 
Miotke, Teresa 27, 131 
Miyakavi/a, Gay 105, 107 
Mock, Robert 23 
Molyneaux, Carl 27 
Molnar, Gary 19 
Monaco, John 2 
Mondelli, Tina 31, 47, 69, 87 
Montalbano, Robert 19 
Moore, Lori 31 
Moore, Philip 26, 27, 55, 131 



!^ H 



t KW^V "^Sf- "?»• 





162 




Moran, William 5. 40. 131 

Moriarty, Madeline 31 52, 63 

Morsovillo, Frank 25, 69 

Mosquera, Vince 131 

Mraz, Laura 12, 29, 55 

Mueller, William 25 

Mulcahy, Patrick 131 

Mulcahy, Sharon 90, 98 

Murray, Patrick 21, 64 

Nadolski, Carol 90, 131 

Natale, Lisa 44, 69 

Nazos, Peter 101 

Nellis, John 131 

Nelmark, Tad 82 

Nelmark, Tate 82, 83 

Nelmark, Todd 132 

Nickels, Connie 13, 67, 70, 132, 143 

Nickl, Steve 82 

Nkemdi, Priscilla 33 

Norris, Jeanne 114 

Noga, Catherine 33 

Notariano, Vincent 17, 29, 132 

Notaro, Julie 3, 8, 23, 25, 40, 71, 87 

Novak, Gregory 82 

Novak, Joel 23 

Novicki, Scott 27 

Nutter, Ray 88, 89 

Nunez, Alfred 108 

O'Brien, John 114 

O'Brien, Laura 31 

O'Brien, Susan 27 

Obrochta, Kathleen 31 



O'Connor, Janine 31, 47 

O'Connor, Julie 27, 132 

O'Connor, Thomas 82 

O'Keefe, John 108 

O'Keefe, Kevin 80 

Okopski, Joseph 82 

O'Leary, Michael 52 

Olenek, Michael 73 

Olsen, Mary 17, 84, 122 

Olson, Andrew 21 

Olson, Barbara 

Olson, Mary 27, 55, 87, 132, 137 

Olsten, Kenneth 52 

Oltyan, Joel 39, 64, 65 

Opalka, Barbara 44, 87 

Ostrowski, John 49, 82, 1 14 

Ostrowski, Elizabeth 30, 68, 87, 141 

Oswald, Susan 27 

Ottolin, Anna 70 

Ott, Diane 31 

Pacana, Randall 24, 95 

Pak, Hosung 19, 97 

Palatinus, Stephen 132 

Palese, Wendy 108 

Palmer, John 115 

Panek, Patricia 47 

Patel, Mayur 2, 5, 27, 67, 68, 77, 132 

Paul, Laurie 67 

Pease, Christine 31, 90 

Pell, Mark 27, 97, 132, 134 

Pender, Rosemary 29, 39 

Perez, Ignacio 3, 100 



163 



INDEX 



Pericht, Patrick 6, 27, 82. 132 

Perkins, Holly 141 

Perrone, Patty 27, 121, 132, 153 

Perrone, Peggy 27, 29, 132, 153 

Peskor, Mark 29 

Peters, Anita 19, 33 

Petersen, Kim 94, 95 

Petrick, Sherri 84 

Petro, Mictiael 23, 44, 82 

Phillips, Mark 27 

Pietryga, Lawrence 19, 80 

Pietryga, Victoria 31 64 

Pivac, Jack 82 

Plaehn, Scott 27, 50 

Plese, Michael 4, 94 

Plys, John 82 

Pollastrini, Vincent 69 

Popielewski, Thaddeus 132 

Praski, Raymond 23 

Proski, Timothy 23 

Puetz, John 88, 89 

Pujols, Javier 11, 89 

Puppel, Charlotte 115 

Purcell, Gary 95 

Rahman, Sahira 70 

Ramirez, Ralph 23, 82 

Ramirez, Sergio 21 

Range, Michael 82 

Rausch, David 115 

Rich, Thomas 108 

Ricciorelli, Michael 21 

Ricken, Richard 23 

Ridge. Karen 21 

Riedesel, Susan 95 

Riley, Michael 135 

Ringelstein, Joseph 23 

Rissky, Jennifer 21, 33, 64, 73 

Robertson, Richard 27 

Rock, Jennifer 31, 47, 87, 98 

Rodriguez, Albert 135 

Rodzak, Michelle 27, 121, 135 

Romano, Kimberly 31, 44, 53, 87 " 

Ropkoy, Kipyegon 70 

Roth, Margaret 115 

Rothman, Michael 82 

Roti, Julie 63 

Ruby, Brian 21 

Ruff. Frank 27. 135 

Ruffolo, Gregory 82 

Rumoro. Dino 5. 12. 29. 55. 135 

Russell. Patricio 27. 57. 135. 150. 153 

Russell. Stephen 23 

Rutkow/ski. Anita 25 

Ryan. Joyce 90. 98. 135. 150. 153 

Ryan. Tim 82 

Santucci. Joseph 8, 19. 21. 47. 55. 64, 65. 

69. 

118. 35 
Santucci. Mary Ann 115 
Sorubbi. Mary 87 



Sassetti. Steve 21 

Scherbarth. Anne 24. 25. 53. 71. 87 

Schille. Mary 25 

Schmelzer. Edward 23, 55, 135, 139, 146 



Schultz, Elizabeth 42 
Schultz, Geoffrey 11: 
Sciackitano, Donald 
139,140, 145, 147 



7, 8, 29, 37, 125, 135, 




164 



Scott, Tim 27 

Sebold. Timottiy 82, 95 

Seely, Peter 64, 115 

Sena, Edwin 12, 27, 55, 64, 67, 69, 122, 125, 

135, 141 
Setzen, Joel 115 
Severyns, Joan 33 
Sheehan, Tracey 31, 47, 87 
Stieeran, Kevin 108 
Sheridan, William 82 
Shonko, Rictiard 115 
Shukin, Alexey 115 
Silvia. Nora 115 
Simanaitis, Daniel 73 
SImonaitis, Diane 33 
Sims, Johin 115 
Siperly, John 21, 82 
Skavi/inski, Daniel 135 
Skrobutt, Andrew 29 
Slinkman, David 74, 83 
Smith, Douglas 19, 82 
Smith, William, 82, 141 
Sofia, David 136 
Soloy, Karen 108 
Sommer, Luann 108 
Sommers, Daniel 136, 142 
Sookdeo, Roxanne 68, 70 
Sonnenberger, David 110 
Sorensen, Peter 110 
Sowa, Stephen 95 
Splitgerber, Jill 27, 72 
Spokas, John 109, 116 





Stabler, Thomas 23 

Stalnaker, Deborah 31, 98 

Stanford, Nicole 39 

Stanglewicz, Maria 11, 25, 55 

Storus, Ralph 105 

Stefo, James 82 

Steinboch, Jeffery 21, 80 

Stephen, Deanna 33 

Stine, Mike 82 

Stgermaine, Don 27, 136 

Stocchero, Joseph 19, 136 

Stoll, Thomas 136 

Stohs, Joanne 29, 108 

Stohs, Mark 29, 116 

Stress, Judi 16 

Streicher. Philippe 136 

Strieker, David 108 

Strizek. Jennifer 67 

Struzik, Jennifer 67 

Stubitsch, Brian 23, 82 

Stuever, Maureen 5, 136 

Suchy, Theodore 1 16 

Sudzus, David 20, 68, 70 

Sugrue, Kerry 27, 29, 55, 136, 153 

Sukley, Kathy 90 

Sullivan, James 82 

Sullivan, Maureen 25, 59, 87 



165 



INDEX 




Toya, Tom 21 

Trok, Melissa 75 

Tsi, Paul 116 

Tucker, John 73, 76, 139 

Tudisco, Judith 139 

Tyler, Monica 33 

Tysl, Gloria 116 

Vacante, Mary Ann 31 

Vaughn, Rick 82 

Verfurth Lawrence 21 

Vesely Stanley 108 

Vest, Jill 13, 56, 72, 139, 143 

Victor, Gerald 116 

Vitole, Christine 33, 69 

Viton, Raphael 23, 82 

Vlastnik, Vikki 10, 43, 61, 74, 139, 

Vikurka, Mary Rose 33, 139, 143 

Vrbanoff, Alexander 6, 17, 27 

Walent, Douglas 23, 27, 82 

Walsh, Jocile 2, 27, 137, 139 

Walsh, John 23 

Walsh, Kathleen 31, 33 

Walsh, Rita 36 

Waltz, Mark 55, 117 

Wonadit, Voraporn 70 

Wanic, Mark 21 

Word, Patrick 82 

Wardlaw, Paul 80 

Watson, Joycie 33, 68, 84 

Webb, Daniel 95 

Weber, Donald 11, 27, 89 

Weber, Kathy 31, 33, 66 

Weber, Lori 33 

Wedig, Frank 4 



145 



Sullivan, William 23 

Sundaram, Anond 97 

Suter, Gregory 61, 92, 136, 140, 142 

Suter, Mary 33, 56 

Sutton, Earnest 23, 82 

Svec, Mary 29 

Swanson, Mary 87 

Swanson, Mary 70 

Swanson, David 90, 116 

Swanson, Carolyn 116 

Swanson, Jon 116 

Tarkowski, Raymond 27, 95, 136 

Taylor, Paul 82 

Temmen, Camda 33 

Terrell, David 19, 36, 80 

Thomas, Dorothy 33 

Thompson, Leigh 27, 84 

Thompson, Bert 108 

Timoney, Mickey 25, 98, 139 

Tomeko, Philip 109 

Tompulis, Paul 27, 63, 153 

Toussaint, Bernard 116 

Toussaint, Paul 25, 73 

Towers, Joseph 23 








166 



Wedoff. Nancy 139 

Wesolowski, Wayne 75, 103, 117 

Westerkamp, Anne 85, 90, 91 

White, Thomas 4, 27, 82 

Widlowski, James 19, 50 

Wilder, William 27, 139 

Williams, Wallace 

Winans, K. Michael 23, 89 

Winkler, Michael 14, 21, 36 

WInograd, David 23 

Winkler, Edward 19, 117 

Witler, Terrence 89 

Wong, Sue 72 

Yates, Brent 23, 82, 95 

Yeh, Lisa 2, 27, 51, 61,68, 70 

Yergovich, Theresa 33, 190 

Zaenger, Ian 76 

Zak, Thomas 25 

Zampa, Nancy 47, 86, 87 

Zee, Linda 41, 68, 69, 86, 37, 139 

Ziccarelli. Concetto 33 

Zidek, Sharolyn 98 

Zimlich, Glenn 19, 82 

Zubay, Ed 19 

Zuber, Karl 21, 95 

Zullo, Mark 68, 70 

Zuppa, Vincent 29, 

Zych, Mark 95, 117 



80, 81 




167 




1986 EAGLE 



EDITOR: Vikki Vlastnik 

STAFF: Nancy Ghanayem 
Edwin Sena 
Lisa Yeh 
Cindy Gorski 
Bob Gerritsen 
Alex Vrbanoff 
Lisa Airan 



PHOTOGRAPH DONORS: 



PHOTOGRAPHERS: 



Joe Santucci, Ed. 
Dan Kemp 
Vikki Vlastnik 
Lisa Airan 
Bob Gerritsen 
Alex Vrbanoff 
Lisa Yehi 
Sue Oswald 



HERFF JONES REP.: Steve Nagel 



The CANDOR 
Alumni Office 
Sports Department 
Communications Office 
Ginny Olson 
Cindy Gorski 
Edwin Sena 
Nancy Gtianayem 



Senior and Faculty Portraits by Wykoff Studios 

SPECIFICATIONS: 168 pages 

400 copies ordered 

Printed by Herff Jones, Marceline, MO. 

printed on Calais 

cover 4 color silkscreen on Vista Lith 

body copy 10 point Avant Garde 

captions 8 point Avant Garde 

main headlines 30 point Optima Block 

subheadlines 18 point Optima 



I would like to especially thank Nancy Ghanayem, without who this book would hove never 
come out! I would also like to thank Steve Nagel for his patience and perseverance, Joe Sartucci 
for all his help and wonderful pictures, Edwin Sena, who was always ready to work, my roommates 
Cindy Gorski, Lisa Yeh and Lisa Airan for their support and help, and Bob Gerritsen and Alex 
Vrbanoff, who were always ready and able to use the camera. To everyone who donated their 
time and talent, 1 deeply THANK YOU! It would not have been possible without youM This book is for 
YOU!! 

Sincerely, 

Vikki J. Vlastnik 

Editor 1986 Eagle 



168 



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